Seed-heads in the December Garden

I think the moment has arrived to show you some of the seed-heads and berries that are providing interest in the garden.  I was away from the garden last week and when I returned, even though there were still a lot of plants flowering it was unmistakably now winter.  Yes the sun has been shining and it still isn’t that cold but of many trees are now bare of leaves displaying their bark, skeletal branches or fruits.

I took the photos yesterday when it was cloudy and we had showers so the light is very different from all images I’ve shown in the last few weeks.  We are fast approaching the shortest day so at least I feel winter won’t be too long and after the celebrations to come the days will slowly be getting longer again and we can look forward to a new growing season.

Seedheads are now the strongest feature in the small island bed

The silhouette of bare branches provides a stark backdrop to the garden

It’s always good to look closely; I found this very strange insect on this Achillea seedhead; it looks like some kind of stick insect which I have found many times in the garden.

Twisted seed pods of Asclepias tuberosa have lost their seeds to the wind, but I already have some germinated seeds from earlier pods.

Crab apples give some bright colour to the upper drive border

As do Nadino berries to the large island bed

rosehips contrast with the leaves of MiscanthusGarlic chives

Papery garlic chives again hopefully dropping their seeds to extend the clump

I love the complex form of white Phlomis

Phlomis fruticosa

Delicate PerovskiaDelicate Perovskia is more beautiful in close-up than when seen as a mass of ghostly stems.

Drumstick Allium (this is part of the Allium stream shown earlier in the year)

Sedum, Pennisetum villosa, Verbena bonariensis, grasses and sheep adding to the view

Contrasting grasses – Calamagrostis x acutiflora 'Karl Foerster', Miscanthus ‘Morning Light’ and a smaller Miscanthus

Still looking attractive on this dull December day

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19 thoughts on “Seed-heads in the December Garden

  1. Your garden still look gorgeous, Christina!
    That stick insect it’s rather strange though, I didn’t know we have insects like that in Italy… You sure it’s not something alien??
    I really like your crab apple, and I’m looking forward to seeing mine grown like that. Is it a ‘Red Sentinel’? Because fruits are like mine.

    I love the colours of euphorbia together with dead grasses, I must try again with E. characias next year, I don’t know why I can’t make it root in this garden while in my previous one it was a kind of weed…

    • Hi Alberto, the Euphorbia is almost a weed for me, it loves my free draining soil, maybe your soil is a bit heavy. I must try to indentify the insect, I have seen it before and it doesn’t appear to do any damage. Christina

  2. Your garden looks amazing as always! I love the colors, especially in the second photo. Your garden has great structure this month too.

    I never knew how much Pennisetum v. could look like a sheep until your photo. And its that an Abutilon blooming behind ‘Karl F.’? *sigh* …I am rather envious, but also pleased to get to share glimpses of your garden in December while my own is so very frozen. 🙂

    Wonderful post!
    Julie

  3. I knew this would be a good post when you suggested it, such wonderful contrast of textures. Loved the white Phlomis, not seen that before, here, the ladybirds overwinter in the seedheads of Phlomis fruticosa. Your garden looks so well furnished with all your seedheads, ours is now just a soggy mess with all the rain we have been having !

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