The Greenhouse

I’m joining Helen at The Patient Gardener for her round-up of what’s happening in the greenhouse this month.

I posted about carrots grown in a pot in the greenhouse over winter here, we are now eating the crop and they are delicious.  I like carrots raw in salads and the purple ones I grew add an interesting colour.

The tomatoes are growing well, I am continuing with the on-going task of tying them to their canes.  As last year most plants I am allowing to grow three stems and the rest of the other side shoots I’m removing.  I may later try the off-shoots as cuttings (as recommended by Bob Flowerdew) and plant them up to produce new plants later in the season.  I’m not very sure of the timing for doing these so it will all be trial and error, has anyone else tried it?

We have had salad lettuce all winter and there are still some to harvest.  I have planted 3 melons and 3 yellow peppers in the back border but I’m concerned as there is a lot of roots from the Laylandii that have obviously been attracted by the irrigation tubes so that the soil in this border isn’t going to be as rich and moist as I would have liked.  I think I will have to put a membrane of some kind to stop the roots and maybe make this a slightly raised bed.

I germinated the seeds in the house as it was too hot for seed production.  There are some aquilegia from seed I collected from a plant in the garden and also some McKenna hybrids I bought.  The Achilea that germinated well are damping off; they were pricked out into my own compost which I fear is too rich for them, they need sharper drainage even at this stage.

I took sedum cuttings this week some leak and some stem cuttings (this site is great at explaining what you do), it is too soon to tell how well they will grow but I do remember my father taking leaf cuttings from a sedum plant of my great aunt and he was very successful.

A large empty pot contains Freesia corms that I’m very much hoping will grow to provide some perfumed cut flowers.

As soon as I put up the shade netting the temperatures dropped but even with the cold winds we are experiencing at the moment the temperature inside is comfortable warm.  I usually have the door open during the day and will soon, I hope, have it open at night too.

The broad beans I sowed in November are now cropping quite well. As I want the tomatoes to have more air and space I am harvesting by pulling up the whole plants.

Rainbow chard waiting to be planted out

Beautiful vegetable foliage counts for Garden bloggers Foliage Day on the  22nd, just leave a link with your comments on the GBFD post.

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4 thoughts on “The Greenhouse

  1. I am amazed at all you are growing in the greenhouse. I will be using my portable to harden off peppers, tomatoes and eggplant next week. Time to plant out more this weekend and the rest next. Your veggies are looking lush and delicious

  2. Looks great, Christina – my toms are still only a few inches tall! I shall be administering the Chelsea chop to my sedums very soon and must remember to pot up some cuttings this year. D

  3. Wow a veritable veggie wonderland. No greenhouse here but I have got two tubs of carrots looking lush and lovely and quite a bit of lettuce in troughs, all in my cold frames. At last it looks like we may be getting some weather here in the UK this week. About time!

  4. You always remind me on how many jobs I need to be done in my garden! I have those sedum cuttings in mind like some unpaid bill… I really need to solve this situation asap, maybe the chill air of these latter days will help me too. My tomatoes have just been planted and I’m watching them grow. I guess I’m going to eat the first crop by the end of june/half july. It’s nice to have a greenhouse to count on in winter, shame in Italy it become an oven in summer!

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