GBFD December – Foliage says it all

At this season of the year flowers are few and far between; those that are in the garden are usually small, with an intense perfume to attract the very few pollinating insects that brave the cold air.  So it is foliage that fulfils the function of colour, form and texture.

Last year I posted about how we can learn about the structure of our gardens by taking photographs in black and white (or rather turning our colour images to black and white by editing our images – very easy to do).  This is useful in summer too when the colour of our favourite blooms blind us to the lack of form and structure and maybe trick us into thinking that our planting is more successful than perhaps it truly is.  In winter when often the colours turn to sepia of their own accord we are more aware of problem areas.

The slope in the early morning

The slope in the early morning

Above the slope, still mostly in shadow has lots of new fresh green from self-seeded Californian poppies and ‘cresto di gallo’ (a wild daisy-flowered plant I allow to grow as its new growth provides adds great taste to salads) and the darker foliage of prostrate Rosemary.

In black and white it looks quite different

In black and white it looks quite different

In black and white I can see the need for some foliage with larger leaves; but this is a very small area and large leaves are provided close-by in the form of Verbascum, but something I will think about when adding something new to this planting.  But there is a good mix of solid and more airy forms.

In the early morning when the garden was white with frost I enjoyed the large ice crystals that covered so much foliage.

Large crystals of ice have decorate the leaves of thyme

Large crystals of ice have decorate the leaves of thyme

The Frost highlights the difference in form of these leaves

The Frost highlights the difference in form of these leaves

The frost has attached itself to the protective hairs on the thyme foliage making it look like a cactus

The frost has attached itself to the protective hairs on the thyme foliage making it look like a cactus

Phlomis foliage edged in white by the frost

Phlomis foliage edged in white by the frost

Even the gravel is frosty, the formal beds looking west

Even the gravel is frosty, the formal beds looking west

In the large island Cerinthe, with the light shining through the foliage, contrasts with the frosty white leaves in other parts of the garden.

In the large island Cerinthe, with the light shining through the foliage, contrasts with the frosty white leaves in other parts of the garden.

Despite ten days of sub-zero temperatures at night most plants are still looking very green and happy.  All the Hemerocallis foliage has turned a deep yellow and has wilted onto the ground to form heaps that to me look like writhing snakes (I’ve no idea why it seems like that to me, we don’t have any yellow snakes as far as I know).

Collapsed Hemerocallis foliage adding a splash of yellow

Collapsed Hemerocallis foliage adding a splash of yellow

I know it is a busy time for everyone but I would enjoy seeing what foliage you have in your garden at the moment that is giving you pleasure.  Just leave a link to your post when you comment, and thank you for joining in this meme to celebrate foliage during the past year.

I would like to wish you all a very Peaceful, Happy Christmas and that the New Year will bring you good health and serenity in your garden.

Advertisements

16 thoughts on “GBFD December – Foliage says it all

  1. I love that idea with the black and white pictures accentuating foliage – I look forward to trying it. Your formal garden no matter what weather looks incredible. The symmetry gets me every time. Happy Holidays to you and yours 🙂

  2. Lovely foliage again Christina decorated with an edging of frost! Very pretty. I just have a short post this time due to the weather!! Wishing a very happy and peaceful Christmas to you and your family Christina.
    My link..www.leadupthegardenpath.com

  3. I .have never thought much about the foliage in the garden, so I appreciated the stimulus and I loved the photographs, Wishing you a very Happy Christmas and happy gardening in 2013, Amelia

  4. Hi Christina, I still have some flowers blooming that should be dormant by now. This year is very strange! I did a round up of my allotment on my blog today, but I did mention just how good my flowers and shrubs have been. I think they liked the mild, wet conditions. Lovely tour around your garden 🙂 Merry Christmas to you!

  5. I love your use of foliage. I’ve got a few things I need to do in my garden to create some more structure. I need to work on that this spring. There’s very little frost here. It’s strangely mild for the time of year. Wishing you a very Merry Christmas, Christina. Best wishes WW 🙂

  6. Christina, your frosty foliage is lovely! The yellow Hemerocallis foliage looks like squids to me! Your garden has fantastic structure, which is one reason I admire it so. I wish you a wonderful Christmas and the very best in 2013!

  7. Hello Christina, like Helen I wanted to pop by and wish you a Happy Christmas too and say thanks for your comments also. I love seeing images from your garden borders. Nice images here too.

    I read of the taking of B&W images a few years ago and have kept meaning to try it – like lots of things. Texture and shape is something that interests me greatly in garden plantings. Maybe 2013 will see me joining you with foliage images – I am a fan there.

    All the best – have a fun Christmas 🙂

  8. My garden is a three season garden and doesn’t offer much in the winter. I have a few plants that never go dormant that provide some refreshing pops of green but most of the garden is sound asleep. Your photos of the icy foliage are wonderful. 🙂

  9. Nice pics Christina! I love frost in winter, definitely much more than snow! I am not having a very cold winter this year though. That cerinthe is incredible! Already out and ready?! I shall buy some plant this year!

  10. for not flowers, my attention is caught by bronze bark on my Pride of India. Think I’ll have to take a cutting. I’m amazed when I look at tall trees in this garden, that I remember bringing as tiny cuttings from the last garden.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.