Harvest Day, January – Still eating Calabrese

We were away for last month’s Harvest day so I thought I’d better make sure I noted down what we are eating from the garden now so that I know for next year.

There isn’t a great variety, but what there is, is good and I have plans to grow more things next winter (Good Greif, am I thinking of next winter already and this one’s not even over yet!).

There are secondary heads on the Calabrese, enough to pick some every week, I love this so will definitely try to grow even more next winter, it is better value than Purple spouting broccoli that has to be in the ground from August/September and really only produces for a few weeks.

Ready to harvest, Calabrese secondary heads

Ready to harvest, Calabrese secondary heads

Pak Choi is actually growing even with freezing nights and some arm days, another chop I want to have available for much of the year.  It can be picked for salads when young but usually grows to harvesting size very quickly so a good infill crop.  I sowed some red Pak Choi in a heated propagator and it germinated in two, yes that’s TWO DAYS!

Pak Choi continues to grow through the cold weather

Pak Choi continues to grow through the cold weather

Growing between the Pal Choi is chicory which has turned a lovely red with the cold temperatures

Growing between the Pal Choi is chicory which has turned a lovely red with the cold temperatures

Swiss Chard is giving us some fresh leaves on a regular basis.  I still have 2 more red cabbages, I’ve been stir frying it with sliced onions and ginger.

Swiss Chard 'Bright Lights'

Swiss Chard ‘Bright Lights’

Swiss Chard 'Bright Lights', I love the mixture of colours

Swiss Chard ‘Bright Lights’, I love the mixture of colours

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The Florence fennel I planted between the Calabrese has survived; I’ve never had any in January or February before – it might be a good crop to try in the greenhouse over winter.  The dwarf beans I sowed are alive and did have flowers but there’s no sign of any actual beans!

Bulb Florence Fennel, protected by the larger plants of Calabrese

Bulb Florence Fennel, protected by the larger plants of Calabrese

Leeks are one of my favourite winter vegetables and as I didn’t grow so many onions last year, and we’ve eaten all that I grew already, I use leeks in recipes that say onions; this is nice as the leeks give a slightly sweeter flavour so make things taste different.

Leeks

Leeks

Lemons and limes are available from the greenhouse and new flowers are forming making a visit into the greenhouse a very sensual experience.

Lovely, juicy lemons

Lovely, juicy lemons

and limes ready for a Thai curry

and limes ready for a Thai curry

HERBS

I have rosemary, salvia, parsley, mint and amazingly still green Marjoram, I dried some leaves as it is one of the few herbs that is actually better dry than fresh; in summer it is often not so good to dry (or I miss the correct moment) so I’m happy to have it now.  There is some Syrian thyme in the greenhouse but all of the plants outside die as soon as it gets cold, they seem to behave as annuals.

Today I planted some red and yellow onion sets, I hope I’m not tempting fate too much by planting them now.

Garlic with perennial celary and newly planted onion sets

Garlic with perennial celary and newly planted onion sets

What are you eating from your garden this month? Pop over to the Gardening Blog and see what Christine and Barbara are picking in their southern hemisphere gardens

16 thoughts on “Harvest Day, January – Still eating Calabrese

  1. Wow you really have a lot on your vegetable garden! The soil look fantastic there and I’m so jealous! Do you start everything from seed? Because you grow varieties that are unlikely found here in Italy, right?

    • Slowly the soil is getting better. I add compost and manure when I can get it. I have grown things mainly from small plants in the past, except Pak Choi and Chard Bright lights; but this year I’m hoping to grow almost everything from seed. Christina

  2. Wonderful selection for this time of year, I really must try harder with my veggies! Almost time to start seed off again for this year, hope we have a better year with a bit more sun and not so much rain!

  3. What a fabulous selection of vegetables – I see you call the sprouting Broccolli Calabrese? Is that right? I prefer this to the heads – I like picking the sprouts when needed and they keep producing! And the chickens love the leaves so everyone is happy!

    • Sprouting broccoli forms its heads in spring and they are usually quiet small. Calabrese (it is commonly incorrectly called broccoli too sometimes) forms one initial large head in the centre, which can be almost as big as a cauliflower; then when that has been cut it forms further smaller heads from all the intersections of the stems. So it produces for several months. I grow it in winter but it can be grown year round.

  4. I can’t believe you have so much still. I might give calabrese a try for this winter coming but I don’t want to think that far ahead really. 😉 Wow, the scent of citrus blossom in your greenhouse. It’s one of my favourite scents.

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