GBBD – Few but very Precious

The few flowers there are in the garden at the moment at very precious to me as a sign that spring is on the way.

Teucrium fruticosa flowers continuously from November through to April so though the flowers are small, they are profuse so they add a blue haze for many months.

Teucrium fruticosa

Teucrium fruticosa

Euphorbia rigida is the first to show signs of the acid yellow inflorescence that proclaims spring is here!

Euphorbia rigida

Euphorbia rigida

First pink colouration appears as the ‘buds’ swell, then they open to reveal bright, acid yellow/green.

Euphorbia rigida

Euphorbia rigida

These small Irises are one of my favourites, they don’t last very long and it can be easy to miss seeing them at all, but they don’t cost very much so I’m prepared to indulge myself.

Iris Purple Gem

Iris Purple Gem

Iris Purple Gem

Iris Purple Gem

Next

Lonicera fragrantissima

Lonicera fragrantissima

Lonicera fragrantissima has the very best perfume of any plant I know! It doesn’t flower for as long a period here as it does in the UK, it needs some cold to trigger the flowers.

Viburnum tinus is mostly tight pink buds with just a few open to revel the white flower inside.  This is another plant that does not flower for such a long period as in the UK where it flowers for maybe 6 months of the year.  My plant has not fully recovered from the burning winds during the summer and a couple of large stems still seem to be dead.  I’ll prune them out later in spring if there really is no chance from them recovering.

Buds of Viburnum tinus

Buds of Viburnum tinus

Opening buds of Viburnum tinus

Opening buds of Viburnum tinus

Arabis

Arabis

Arabis, grown from seed is full of tightly closed buds, but a few are braving the cold nights.

A surprise is that one Phlomis sufuiticosa has buds that are nearly open, while another plant, perhaps a metre away, doesn’t even have any buds yet!

Phlomis

Phlomis

I planted these yellow Crocus Ancyrensis last autumn, I love their sunny colour.

Yellow Crocus Ancyrensis

Yellow Crocus Ancyrensis

Rosemary continues to attract bees to its masses of blue flowers.

Rosemary

Rosemary

But best of all are the dazzling flowers of Anemone Sylphide; I’ve never manages to grow these before and they are one of my favourite cut flowers too so now I’ve had some success I’ll plant lots more next year!

Anemone Sylphide

Anemone Sylphide

Anemone Sylphide

Anemone Sylphide

Anemone Sylphide

Anemone Sylphide

Not only are the colours stunning but the flowers last a long time, I showed the buds just before they opened for last GBBD and this is one of the flowers that was a bud then – I am impressed because we’ve had frosts many of the nights and heavy rain and terrifyingly strong winds and still the flowers are beautiful. Others I planted under the Mulberry tree are slower to flower but that will only extend the season further.

A very happy Bloomday to all gardeners everywhere. Thanks to Carol for hosting.

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33 thoughts on “GBBD – Few but very Precious

  1. Such lovely spring flowers! I have never heard of Teucrium fruticosa, had to look it up. Your Anemone Sylphide sure is a stunner! Can’t wait for spring to get going properly here in London, it has been a slow start due to very cold weather for weeks on end. Happy GBBD!

  2. You always show such an interesting variety of plants. Love the pretty white flower of arabis and your anemones are divine. I have never grown them but have some anemones on order which won’t be sent until March. It will be 62F here today with slight chance of snow tonight.

  3. Some lovely flowers. It’s so heartening to watch things bloom in the midst of wintry squalls. Spring shrubs are on my must-plant list, I have my mind on an earlier flowering Viburnum than our summer-flowering V. plicatum Pink Sensation, and a voucher still from Christmas to spend…

  4. Hi Christina, you have a lot of unusual colors of flowers for me, because ours i think are always falling with the ordinary, reds, oranges, yellows! That green is very lovely for me, did you notice that in my post i even showed the sepals looking like petals just to effect green flowers! And that purple one, oh so beautiful. Blogging really makes us have what we normally don’t have! thanks.

  5. I agree that the flowers are really so precious at the moment and so well appreciated. You have a lovely selection and it is interesting that some bloom later or less than if they were further north. Your anemone is beautiful, I don’t expect to see any for months.

  6. Those anemones are a glorious colour, they must make you smile every time you see them. These early signs of Spring are so precious, aren’t they. Lovely iris, mine don’t seem to have survived this year (they are in a pot). I’ll have to get some more for next year.

  7. Such a lot of beautiful flowers, hard to decide which I like best. I think the anemones are so beautiful, such gorgeous saturated colours. I’ve never been lucky with them before, maybe I ought to try again!

    • Do try them again. The second group I planted I had soaked first as I read that helps. But the bright pink ones just went straight into the ground; if I remember correctly it did rain a lot soon after planting them so they got a good soaking anyway. Christina

  8. I love the anemone! I am so happy to see spring blooms arriving. I want to get out in the garden today, as sunshine has finally returned. But it’s freezing out there, with a cold wind blowing. Winter is not quite done.

  9. Oh my Christina, by gosh your garden has kicked into life! Way ahead of here but we’d expect that, great colours to brighten any dull days. I always love euphorbia blooms and I do like that iris purple gem – that is the colour for my garden! Wishing you a belated GBBD 😀

  10. Anemone Sylphide is just beautiful! I hope to see a drift of them in your garden next Feb 🙂 The purple irises are definitely worth it as well.
    All white with snow again here… I am ready for some sun. Thanks for sharing your flowers!

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