GBBD March – spring begins

Not in the sense that we have spring weather, no, it is cold, it is wet and the winds have been gale force; there has been some sun but mostly March has definitely come in like a lion…..

But despite this, blooms have opened, some bulbs are already finished, Crocus have been shredded by the whipping wind and Iris reticulate, although lasting longer than other years are now putting on foliage rather than flowering.

The best blooms are still the Anemone sylphide, close to them the other bulbs I chose for their similar fuchsia pink colour are showing their buds.  Hyacinth Miss Saigon, another bulb I’ve never grown before will be open in a few days and Barcelona, Persian Pearl or Antraciet Tulips are showing colour in their buds.  I don’t know which tulip this is because I planted all three here hoping for a continuation of intense colour, I’ll know when it is fully open I hope.

Anemone Sylphide

Anemone Sylphide, no apologies for showing these again!

Hyacinth Miss Saigon

Hyacinth Miss Saigon

Barcelona, Persian Pearl or Antraciet Tulip?

Barcelona, Persian Pearl or Antraciet Tulip?

The plum is now flowering with the promise of small sweet yellow plums later in summer.

Plum blossom

Plum blossom

The rest of the blooms are those you would expect in March with one exception, Rosa rimossa on the south-facing pillars has two flowers, one has already been almost destroyed by wind by the other is more tucked away so will hopefully bloom for a little longer.

Rosa rimosa three days ago

Rosa rimosa three days ago

and now after the wind

and now after the wind

R. rimosa, another bud opening

R. rimosa, another bud opening

Ceanothus repans continues to flower out of its usual late spring season, the plant is dying back in the middle and I fear it will die, they are capricious shrubs that often die for no apparent reason, I will replace it if it does die, I am trying cuttings but they are slow to put down roots.

Ceanothus repans

Ceanothus repans

Cerinthe is late flowering this year but there are masses of self-seeded plants in the large island making quite a statement.

Cerinthe

Cerinthe

Cerinthe's purple bell flowers

Cerinthe’s purple bell flowers

Viburnum tinus still not fully open, it really is a short season here

Viburnum tinus still not fully open, it really is a short season here

Periwinkle grows in the hedges

Periwinkle grows in the hedges

Violas have been flowering all winter in large pots which will some be displaying tulips

Violas have been flowering all winter in large pots which will some be displaying tulips

Euphorbia rigida is still putting on a great show

Euphorbia rigida is still putting on a great show
Euphorbia mysernites is adding colour around the garden

Euphorbia mysernites is adding colour around the garden

A few Verbena are flowering in sunny spots

A few Verbena are flowering in sunny spots

Prostrate Rosemary is doing a great job of forming a strean of blue on the slope

Prostrate Rosemary is doing a great job of forming a strean of blue on the slope

20130313_9999_10There’s lots more flowers to come.

Lonicera fragrantissima is at its best now, sweetly perfuming the air by the drive

Lonicera fragrantissima is at its best now, sweetly perfuming the air by the drive

Teucrium is reliable for flowering all winter

Teucrium is reliable for flowering all winter

Clumps of Muscari are beginning to bloom

Clumps of Muscari are beginning to bloom

where-as Eleagnus is coming to an end

Where-as Eleagnus is coming to an end

Oestiospmum also have a few blooms

Osteospmum also have a few blooms

Thank you Carol at MayDreams for hosting GBBD; visit to see what gardeners around the world have flowering in March.  Happy GBBD to everyone.

31 thoughts on “GBBD March – spring begins

  1. Amazing to see all these blooms even with the cold weather…the flowers bravely bloom despite the weather…we are frozen here below freezing temps, and snow…it is supposed to snow some every day right through the beginning of spring.

    • What a long winter you have had, ours has seemed longer than usual but when I think of you I really can’t complain. The snow that was forecast here hasn’t arrived, but the wind is bitingly cold today. Christina

  2. So many lovely flowers Christina, I had a quick look at my rosemary and sure enough, I hadn;t noticed that it was flowering, but nowhere near as many flowers that you have. Your anemones are still beautiful, such a lovely colour, will have to see what I can do next autumn, if I remember!

  3. March has been cold and windy here, too. But we have a few days sunshine that has made a lot of difference in the garden.
    You have lots of beautiful blooms! I am stunned by the beauty of the yellow rose!
    Happy GBBD!
    Lea
    Lea’s Menagerie

  4. You weren’t lying about roses in your garden! 😛
    In a way or another Spring is definitely pushing in, although a few chilly winds are still blowing…
    I love your euphorbia carpet and the cerinthe! That corner under the pine trees is just perfect.

  5. The colors of early Spring! My Rosemary is a sparse bloomer: abundant plants, few blooms. We had Lonicera fragrantissima when I was a child — we called it January Jasmine, a descriptive name there. Love all your purples.

    • Quite a long way on the other side! You always have snow in winter, but we don’t every year. I imagine you have temperatures well below zero even during the day, we rarely do. But you will surely appreciate your blooms when they arrive and you’ll have flowers in August when I probably won’t. Christina

  6. Wow! What a gorgeous display! So diverse too, a real range of interesting plants. I love it!! Really inspiring. Giving me some good ideas for next year. Thanks so much for sharing 🙂

  7. It’s so exciting to see so many things blooming in your garden Christina. I like your Euphorbias a lot and also the Viburnum. Also it’s good to see the long view of your hill. Susie

    • Which one did you get? I bought another silver foliage, much lower growing one which I hope to be able to propagate; I also have another variety that I can’t quite understand why it is a Teucrium at all as it is so different!

      • I was keeping my eye out for fruticans when I saw TeucriumxLucidrys – “Hedge germander. Ideal for use in place of box hedging. Small dark green leaves, with pinky-purple flowers. aromatic foliage and good for bees.” I must admit the last bit rather got me and it will be going into a hedging position in the back garden but it is nothing like fruticans, I wouldn’t have noticed it as it isn’t very eye-catching at the moment.

    • I treat it as an annual here too, because the plant is so ugly once it has flowered, luckily the seeds form and mature very quickly so I am never without new plants. Christina

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