White flowers in the garden, May

Although I don’t have a Sissinghurst-type white garden as part of my garden I do love white flowers.  They add pools of light in dark shady areas and are, for me, essential to have on the terrace or near it because they seem to be luminous in the evening as dust and then night arrives.

Here are the white flowers in the garden during the first week in May.

Iris 'Immortality', a lovely pure white

Iris ‘Immortality’, a lovely pure white

The above you’re seen in my post about Irises, but worth seeing again I feel.

Philadephus is filling the garden with its wonderful perfume

Philadephus is filling the garden with its wonderful perfume

Allium Karataviense

Allium Karataviense

Rosa Sally Holmes

Rosa Sally Holmes

Unknown name white Cistus

Unknown name white Cistus

Aquilegea vulgaris alba

Aquilegea vulgaris alba

Aquilegea vulgaris alba with Allium Roseum

Aquilegea vulgaris alba with Allium Roseum

Convolvulus cneorum

Convolvulus cneorum

cerastium tomentosum -  snow in summer

cerastium tomentosum – snow in summer

Cistus

Cistus

Solomon's Seal

Solomon’s Seal

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Photinia flowers, the bees love them

Photinia flowers, the bees love them

Allium Roseum are actually native here and people are surprised I bought them for the garden

Allium Roseum are actually native here and people are surprised I bought them for the garden

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19 thoughts on “White flowers in the garden, May

  1. White flowers in a garden are so beautiful, as you say, especially at dusk when they shine out, I don’t think you can ever have too many! Your garden is way ahead of ours, we still have these delights to come!

  2. Lovely – I have never seen a pure white aquilegia before and it is quite stunning. And I have not seen Solomon’s Seal for years! Nobody seems to grow it here – perhaps the wrong soil… It’s nice to see your Philadelphus flowering already. (Mine will need some time yet!)

    • the Allium grows wild here, in fact Italian friends are always surprised that I have planted it in the garden. Luckily because it is native it spreads slowly, it is pretty in bud, in flower and the seed cases are rose pink (hence the name I imagine). Christina

  3. Tante volte sedotta dalle immagini del giardino bianco di Sissinghurst ho pensato di usare solo fiori bianchi per un’aiuola, ma non sono riuscita ad essere costante nel perseguire questa idea. Il cisto sembra lo stesso che ho io e a me è stato venduto come salvifolius. Questa mattina dopo aver visto da te l’allium roseum sono andata a cercarlo nel mio oliveto e l’ho inserito qua è là tra rose e lavande. C’è anche una foto sull’ultimo numero di Gardenia pag. 120.

  4. Immortality is beautiful! I love the drooping heads of your Aquilegia too; I grow the green Lime Sorbet here, which fades to mostly white, but the pure white is rather something…

  5. Ciao Christina! i love white flowers and I totally agree with you about planting them close to the house, especially those summer used sites, like a pergola or a terrace or a patio. I have Sally Holmes starting to bloom just beside the outdoor table under the pergola, I love it.

    • Ciao Alberto, Sally Holmes is such an amazing rose and so interesting that it was hybridised in the UK but it isn’t hot enough for it to grow well there. What other white flowers do you have? Christina

      • That’s really weird, I didn’t know it! 🙂
        I have a lot of white gauras that enlighten summer nights, but it’s not in bloom yet. I have a white cistus just starting to bloom now, I think it’s very similar to yours but I keep it in a pot because I fear it’s too wet here in winter for cistus… And then I have quite a lot of white roses, that I love.

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