My Thoughts – Hemerocallis

Ephemeral they may be (each flower only last one day) but they really add intense colour into the garden over a long period.

Day Lilies (their common name) are tolerant of a wide range of garden conditions.  They don’t like intense shade but will flower well in partial shade.  They are pretty drought tolerant but will flower better when there is some moisture in the soil.  In winter the foliage dies back so they will survive low winter temperatures with no problems.

There are many, many cultivars; mostly the flowers are trumpet-shaped but some of the newer varieties are slightly star-shaped.  There are a vast array of colours, hues and sizes so you are sure to find one that is right for you.  They flower in slightly different periods and once a good clump has formed will flower for quite a long period.  Given some summer rain (or irrigation) and by cutting back the initial flower stems when they have finished flowering some will give a second flowering in autumn.  If the leaves become untidy in summer, cutting back the foliage to the base will produce fresh green foliage to provide good groundcover.  I wouldn’t recommend cutting back the foliage unless there is sufficient water.

I have a large clump of Stella di d’Oro planted under an Arbutus, they are inter-planted with Tulip Lambada to give a succession of colour; the foliage of the Hemerocallis successfully hiding the dying foliage of the tulips.  They flower in May, here seen with a Salvia.

Hemerocallis Stella di d'Oro

Hemerocallis Stella di d’Oro

A very pure yellow, slightly later flowering and taller than Stella di d’Oro is Happy returns.

Hemerocallis 'Happy Returns'

Hemerocallis ‘Happy Returns’

Hemerocallis 'Happy Returns'

Hemerocallis ‘Happy Returns’

Hemerocallis 'Happy Returns'

Hemerocallis ‘Happy Returns’

I have two whites which I now cannot distinguish; this year they are flowering much better than in other years so I think they appreciate the wet spring more than the yellows.  I think this is Joan Senior and this Gentile Shepherd

H. Gentle Shepherd

H. Gentle Shepherd

Growing to about a metre tall the very common H. fulva is planted all along the back border.  It has increased enormously meaning I can divide them and extend the planting.

H. fulva in the back border (June)

H. fulva in the back border (June)

H. fulva (June)

H. fulva (June)

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There are other oranges, H. Hot Ember and H. Mauna Loa.

H. Mauna Loa

H. Mauna Loa

H. Duke of Durham? or H. Hot Ember

H. Duke of Durham? or H. Hot Ember

Hot Ember is what I ordered but looking through the catalogue this colour appears to be Duke of Durham.  Any comments about which it is gratefully received.

Strutter’s Ball is an intense dark violet.

H. Strutter's Ball

H. Strutter’s Ball

Grape ripples is reputed to be perfumed but I have to admit that I haven’t noticed any perfume.

H. Grape ripples?

H. Grape ripples?

I bought H. Scirocco to under plant Rosa mutabilis as it has a similar mix of colours.  The roses sooned filled the space so I moved the Hemerocallis and they need more time to really settle where I have planted them.

H. Scirocco

H. Scirocco

I purchased all except the tall orange H. fulva from a specialist grower in Sardinia (Vivaio i campi ); as I bought so many he gave me three extras, I don’t know their names but the yellow one has a huge flower and the plant has bulked up well.  The star-shaped dark magenta one fits well in the ‘Magenta zone’ and maybe ‘Crimson Pirate’.  The other is a washed out orange with a stripe, not my favourite but not unpleasant.

These were all flowering today:

H. Starling

H. Starling

H. 'Mary Todd' or 'Forsyth Lemon Drop'

H. ‘Mary Todd’ or ‘Forsyth Lemon Drop’

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H. Mauna Loa

H. Mauna Loa

H. fulva

H. fulva

H. Duke of Dureham

H. Duke of Dureham

H. Joan Senior

H. Joan Senior

20130710_9999_2

H. Gentle Shepherd

H. Gentle Shepherd

I didn’t have the name when I purchased this antique pink blotched variety.  Looking in the catalogue all these look identical to me! Allways Afternoon (miss-spelt in the catalogue), Chicago Heirloom, Druids Chant or Royal Braid – take your pick!

Hemerocallis 'Allways Afternoon' ???????????

Hemerocallis ‘Allways Afternoon’ ???????????

Hemerocallis 'Allways Afternoon' ???????????

Hemerocallis ‘Allways Afternoon’ ???????????

Hemerocallis 'Allways Afternoon' ???????????

Hemerocallis ‘Allways Afternoon’ ???????????

Whichever one this is, I would have to say if is difficult to place with other plants, its antique pink colour is not like anything else.

Does anyone have any experience of the pale pink varieties, I’d be interested in knowing if they maintain their colour.

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36 thoughts on “My Thoughts – Hemerocallis

  1. Well, well, I can see we share similar tastes in the hemerocallis front too. I like them simple and elegant, like all the cultivars you have. I hate the frilly or monster coloured new cultivars! I don’t have many, I shall increase their number though, they really worth it. Nice the picture with h. fulva, verbena, that grass and that pale yellow little flowers of which I can’t remember the name in this moment…

  2. So many lovely daylilies! I like them so much with grasses… they have such a loose feel to them. I love them flowing over your gravel paths! Just perfect. Glad to see your daylilies today also!!

  3. Thanks for identifying H. fulva. I always called it the “common orange one”. It grows out along the road into our main drive, where the dying flowers are hardly noticeable (I used to get tired of snapping them off). All of our day lilies are passalongs, but after seeing yours, I may need to add a few more.

  4. I love day lilies, and have some large orange ones too…. no idea of any of the names, as they were all here before my time! That pink one is beautiful, but somehow day lilies for me have to be shades of orange…

  5. Mi piace la gamma degli arancioni perché insieme alle altre piante non danno mai la sensazione di accostamenti studiati! L’effetto è sempre molto naturale. Se non sbaglio H. Fulva dovrebbero essere molto rustici e quindi perfetti per me. Anche io, trovo bellissima e poetica la foto con sisyrinchium, verbena, e la vaporosa graminacea sullo sfondo. Non è per caso il miscanthus che mi hai regalato?

    • Sì, Anna Maria è proprio la Miscanthus ‘Morning Light’. Sono anche più belle quest’anno perché abbia piovuto così tanto. Sì, Anna Maria è proprio la Miscanthus ‘Morning Light’. Sono anche più belle quest’anno perché abbia piovuto così tanto.

  6. Gosh, what a lot you’ve got. I’ve planted some spider daylilies from a nursery I found on twitter. They are so exotic looking and about to flower – I’m very excited! D

  7. Your wonderful variety of day lilies puts me to shame. All I have is the common day lily that has been blooming in my garden since the beginning of time. I keep saying I will add some of the newer varieties of different colors. I especially like your Grape Ripples.

  8. Christina, I forgot to mention in my comment that the monarda you asked about is ‘Petite Delight’. It has taken a couple of years to establish itself, but this year it is lovely.

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