GBBD – A sunny February Bloomday

I described on Thursday’s post what a mixed bag of weather we have had this week; the same can be said for the whole month, the only good thing is that we’ve not had any really cold weather.

Spring flowers are increasing and there are less roses blooming; there needs to be none at all as I should prune them soon.  I’ve begun the spring clean-up of weeding and cutting back perennials and removing the seed-heads that have given so much pleasure over the last few months.

Osteospermum

Osteospermum

Rosemary

Rosemary

Rosa westerland a very different faded colour in winter

Rosa westerland a very different faded colour in winter

Rosa Sophie's perpetual, being just that!

Rosa Sophie’s perpetual, being just that!

Rosa rimosa, the only rose that is actually looking very good

Rosa rimosa, the only rose that is actually looking very good

rosa mutabilis

rosa mutabilis

Iris unguicularis

Iris unguicularis

Arabis

Arabis

Euphorbia rigida

Euphorbia rigida

Anemone

Anemone

Mahonia

Mahonia

arbutilon

arbutilon

Crocus

Crocus

Anemone Sylphide

Anemone Sylphide

Anemone Sylphide with hungry visitor

Anemone Sylphide with hungry visitor

Iris reticulata

Iris reticulata

Lonicera fragrantissima

Lonicera fragrantissima

The most noticeable thing about the images today is, I think, the LIGHT, not just the sunshine but the quality of light; it wants to tell me that it isn’t winter any more but that spring is here (I hope it isn’t just teasing!).

If you would like to see what’s flowering elsewhere in the world, pop over to Carol at May Dreams Garden, or better still why not post about what’s blooming for you today.

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36 thoughts on “GBBD – A sunny February Bloomday

  1. It’s so nice to see spring coming, and I know what you mean about the light. Even here with the snow it feels great when the sun comes out and warms you up. It warms you in a way that we haven’t felt since late last year.
    There’s that lonicera again. I may have to add it after all, even with the “nothing special the rest of the year” label 🙂

  2. We’ve had plenty of sun but, regrettably, not your rain. Some of the same flowers are currently blooming in my garden, although no roses as yet. spring has already arrived in southern California too.

  3. I think I’ll never get used to your roses at this time of the year, Christina 😉 Do you think the fact they don’t get a proper cold phase throws them back in performance? Lovely flowers, I especially like the anemones.

  4. How lovely to have all these roses to enjoy for so long – when will they start up again properly for this season? I did find one rose here today, but forgot to include it in GBBD

  5. You certainly have a grand collection of blooms Christina and way ahead of my garden this year.I always intend to plant crocus, then never get back to it. Your cheerful yellow on is nice. Also great photo of the Osteospermum.

  6. I can’t reconcile how much further along in the season you are in Italy, yet you have crocus in flower which I do and Osteospermums that I would not see for a couple of months. Is this the normal flowering time for you?

    • I think realistically we are about a month ahead of Southern England (certainly for planting out things like tomatoes and peppers). For other plants it is harder because things flower because of different triggers – light levels, temperatures, and also amount of cold received, so that my daffodils flower after or at the same time as my tulips. That’s why everything flowers at once at the end of May, roses, Azaleas often flower at the same time, so yes, it is confusing.

  7. It makes such a difference, doesn’t it, the changing quality of the light. I nearly bought some anemones when I ordered my dahlias and next bunch of snowdrops, but I chickened out as I wasn’t entirely sure where I was going to put them, which breaks my rule! I, too. love the rosa mutabalis.

    • I’m so pleased about the way the Anemone grow and flower, I’m sure you could find somewhere to put them, their foliage appears in spring and last through early summer then disappears so it will grow with summer flowering perennials.

  8. Your Rosa rimosa really is beautiful, as is your anemone! Despite lingering cold, warmer weather is on the way here. I hope to soon have spring blooms in my garden. I also have noticed a change in the quality of the light. Winter has had a good grip on us the past two months, but at least that will cut down on summer mosquitos and gnats this year. We were overdue for a cold winter.

    • We really needed some cold weather for the same reason, I’ve already seen a locust flying and although they are unlikely to achieve plague proportions I think they may prove more of a problem this year.

  9. You’ve so much going on Christina – isn’t it amazing what a bit of extra light does to not only the garden but our spirits. Well done on getting your tidying up started – I’ve made a small start but can’t help but worry that winter will come to Scotland just as we least expect it!

  10. Beautiful photos – but roses and rosemary flowering at the same time seems odd when I’m used to a Yorkshire garden! It’s lovely to see all your blooms though as a reminder of where we’ll be in a few weeks time… weather permitting

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