Foliage in May and The Slope on Thursday 22nd May

Welcome to GBFD, when I encourage you think about the effect foliage has on the overall design of your garden. You are welcome to write about any foliage, it doesn’t have to be a plant you have only for its foliage interest, better perhaps if you think about a plan that flowers for a limited time but its foliage is beautiful or interesting or makes an interesting form for a longer period.

Today just a few view general views of the garden that demonstrate just how important foliage is in my garden.

The formal beds

The formal beds

Walnut tree is giving more shade this year

Walnut tree is giving more shade this year

From the Left hand bed towards the circular rose bed

From the Left hand bed towards the circular rose bed

The wisteria is giving pleasant shade already

The wisteria is giving pleasant shade already

Stipa tenuissima looking at its very best!

Stipa tenuissima looking at its very best!

The small island in my garden has only Sisyrinchium striatum flowering at the moment along with Stipa gigantea, whose panicles are spectacular at present. The whole island still looks fresh and full showing that flowers are an added ingredient in a planting scheme rather than of prime importance. Don’t panic I’m not advocating having a flowerless garden just suggesting that if you don’t think even just a little about the foliage you won’t be entirely satisfied with your planting schemes and maybe you won’t realise quite why you are dissatisfied.

The small island

The small island

Stipa gigantea

Stipa gigantea

May is the month when almost every plant I have flowers, or so it seems! But even with the colour from the roses, etc. etc the predominant colour is green!

To join with GBFD please include a link back to this post and leave a comment here with the link to your post. I always look forward to reading what you think and what is important to you at the moment.

Today is Thursday so I can’t miss showing you the slope today. I mentioned last week that some new plants were beginning to make their presence felt.

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Gaura has just begun to flower and will continue for as long as there is a little moisture in the ground

Gaura has just begun to flower and will continue for as long as there is a little moisture in the ground

Californian and European poppes but what is that in the background? Giant Verbascum leaves giving a sign of what's to come

Californian and European poppes but what is that in the background? Giant Verbascum leaves giving a sign of what’s to come

Verbena bonariensis are taller this year with all the rain

Verbena bonariensis are taller this year with all the rain

Notice how the Eschscholzia close as soon as there is a little shade.

Notice how the Eschscholzia close as soon as there is a little shade.

Yesterday was the hottest day of the year so far, so from a very pleasant couple of days at the beginning of the week it looks like we might be heading into summer (I do hope not yet). What’s the weather giving you at the moment, rain, sun, wind? Let me know it’s always lovely to know what you are experiencing.

38 thoughts on “Foliage in May and The Slope on Thursday 22nd May

  1. Lovely pictures. I particularly like the one with the walnut tree. I spent quite a bit of time today “combing” my Stipa Tenuissima to remove the seedheads – do you have a problem with it reseeding everywhere?

    • It does seed around a lot but it isn’t difficult to remove from where I don’t want it. I do comb the Stipa, though, to pull out the dead part later in summer.

  2. I do like a bit of formality to contrast with the billowing flowers in the rest of the garden, it gives a restful space which is very peaceful and calming to the eye, in other words , I like your lavender and box!
    Your slope is certainly firing on all cylinders now, getting better and better each time we see it, Love the gaura, it looks like tiny butterflies hovering!
    Thanks for hosting once more, my link is-
    http://leadupthegardenpath.com

    • Hi Pauline, thanks for joining in again this month. Yes, I think most gardens need some calm spaces, or it all becomes too busy, I think the small island has too many different plants but at least atthe moment they’re all green.

  3. I really should join in with this Christina, foliage is really important to me in the garden, it’s what provides most of the form and texture. And I will as soon as I get my life a little more organised! Sitting under the shade of the wisteria must be so restful. The formal beds look beautiful now, with the purple haze still to come.

  4. It’s lovely to see the Gaura in flower, and I do look forward to watching the Verbascum grow – the leaves are beauties in themselves!

    • Hi Sally, welcome, thank you for your comments. The property is 3,000 square metres including the house and the olives so it isn’t enormous, but it keeps me occupied. Thank you for joining in GBFD this month, I look forward to seeing what you have chosen to show us. Christina

  5. as ever Christina the foliage in your garden looks lush and has lots of varied textures, I also like the tree line giving height to the garden, the slope just seems to get better and better, believe me Christina you do not want to know what the weather up here is doing, Frances

      • 🙂 or just plain move, I’ve been doing some inside decorating jobs, I keep fluctuating but the fluctuations are becoming more in favour of selling and going some where drier, I enjoy virtually your drier garden, Frances

        • The heat has its downsides too, but I don’t think I could tolerate your cold weather even though your scenery is wonderful. You should come to try it here!

  6. I love your formal beds, Christina! An interesting take on a parterre, using lavender as the edging, and box as “cornerstones”, with the infill of Perovskia an inspiration. The interest is all provided by three completely different shades of “green” foliage and of texture. But then, when the Perovskia flowers…wow! And scented to boot! Of course, grasses have to be the ultimate foliage plant, providing not only texture but also movement, in the garden. They can change the whole “feel” of a border – I love them!

  7. I love your header photo, Christina. And as to what the weather is doing here, we had an almighty thunderstorm at the Priory yesterday. Lightning, thunder, hail and sheet rain – the noise in the greenhouse was deafening. I watched the two rams standing, completely unperturbed until at one point Cyril shook himself like a labrador. (Well, you did ask). D

  8. Your garden demonstrates just how well grasses can pull the structure of a garden together, Christina – and doesn’t your lavender foliage look great (well, I am guessing it’s the lavender)? Mine is looking healthy too after your advice on pruning – thank you! The Californian poppies are still going strong – the have been superb, and I love seeing the gaura mingling with other plants. Thanks for hosting the GBFD meme – I am a day late at http://ramblinginthegarden.wordpress.com/2014/05/23/garden-bloggers-foliage-day-hosta-la-vista/

  9. Hi Christina,your poppies look beautiful.We are all planting them here for the WW1 centenary but a cold ,wet spring/ summer will not help them!The formal garden looks cool and elegant as always.

  10. Your formal garden is a really beautiful space Christina, proving that sometimes less really is more. I also love the way the mature trees contribute, particularly that cyprus.

    I was interested to see that you are growing Sisyrinchium striatum, I’ve only just come across it, but it looks as if it might fit in to my front garden rather well, I need more vertical accents in the central bed and am starting a list of plants to audition for the role!

    I am a day late, and it was raining so hard earlier I thought it was going to have to be even later, but my post is up http://plantaliscious.janetbruten.co.uk/2014/05/garden-bloggers-foliage-day-may-2014/, thanks again for hosting!

    • Yes, definately Sisyrinchium would be great for you. If it is planted anywhere damp it can go black dearly in the season, mine rarely does as it is in the Small Island and the front of the Back border aka the Spring Walk; there is no summer irrigation to either beds so just rain water. Wet during winter and spring doesn’t seem to be a problem but I’ll let you know if they are different this year with all the rain we’ve had (are having). Thanks for joining in GBFD this month, you are only one dau late, that’s nothing, you are always most welcome. Christina

  11. You use foliage in such a beautiful way Christina…sorry I could not join in even though it was my intention…I had hoped to be home and well on my way to mending by the 22nd, but the best laid plans as they say….

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