The west view from the terrace – Light

I thought I would take the images for today’s post yesterday evening, but the sun shines directly into the lens (and one’s eyes) so they aren’t very helpful in seeing what’s happening, first thing this morning wasn’t much better, I prefer those taken at about 3.40 pm this afternoon.

Here are the images taken at about 7pm.

Evening, looking west

Evening, looking west

The Madonna lilies are the most obvious flower in the view, looking from the right of the window

The Madonna lilies are the most obvious flower in the view, looking from the right of the window

Bad image looking directly into the sun but it does show how the view has opened up to the left of the greenhouse, a lot more of the sunset can be seen now

Bad image looking directly into the sun but it does show how the view has opened up to the left of the greenhouse, a lot more of the sunset can be seen now

In the next images I stood at the front of the terrace but still in the centre; they show a 180° view, I hope you get an impression of what it all looks like.

Turning to my left (looking south) the last pillar of the terrace with Rosa Veilchenblau, R. Clair Matin, rosemary and Cyprus

Turning to my left (looking south) the last pillar of the terrace with Rosa Veilchenblau, R. Clair Matin, rosemary and Cyprus

You can hopefully orientate yourself by the edge of the Melia tree

You can hopefully orientate yourself by the edge of the Melia tree

The central cyprus is the view point for the slope on Thursday posts

The central cyprus is the view point for the slope on Thursday posts

Completing the 180° view

Completing the 180° view

I’ve been meaning to write about my thoughts on paths and pathways for a while now, but it will probably have to be when not a lot is happening in the garden during August; but if you read gardening magazines how often do they show views along pathways? A lot, I think you’ll find. I began thinking about this when I was photographing the Spring Walk on a weekly basis; the outcome is that I can already see that the layout of the beds and paths here don’t work from this window. When I planned it I didn’t want to have the path leading off at right angles to the window but there does need to be a view into the path which looks much more interesting if you look from the end of the terrace by the table.

This afternoon the light was very different

This afternoon the light was very different

Moving to the end of the terrace the view in much more tempting to explore

Moving to the end of the terrace the view in much more tempting to explore

Closing in even the small amount of path showing is still an invitation

Closing in even the small amount of path showing is still an invitation

This is the 'corner' of the Upper Drive border and although it appears full it is unsatisfying.

This is the ‘corner’ of the Upper Drive border and although it appears full it is unsatisfying.

Do you find you learn a lot about the layout of your garden when you photograph it? Sometimes it can help resolve a feeling of dissatisfaction. I realise for example that when I sit here on the terrace my eyes are directed to the distant view rather than resting for a while ‘in the garden’. I have a couple ideas already how I will tweak the view from here so thank you for choosing this view, I don’t think I would have concentrated on this without writing about it here.

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17 thoughts on “The west view from the terrace – Light

  1. Christina, we are our own hardest critics, never satisfied with what we have done. I agree, a path certainly leads you into a view and tempts you to explore further.
    Your Madonna Lilies are so beautiful backlit by the sun!

    • I always find the Madonna lilies disappointing, I think because they are so much trouble with the lily beetle and then the ones I see growing virtually wild are so much better!

  2. Taking photos is a great way to see the garden layout. Clever to show the 180 degree view. Your photos look nice but I agree with you, it’s sometimes hard to get the pictures at the time I want–waiting for the right light is not always an option.

    • Almost all images in books are taken very early in the morning or evening, at mid day all the colours are completely burnt out here and I imagine with you too Susie.

  3. Of course, I don’t take the photos around here. They do help, but my main tool is wandering around and staring, then imagining possible changes as I am in the garden.

  4. I think I have learnt more about layout looking at the photographs of your garden than the ones of mine! I’m looking at your Verbena. I have acquired some but they are totally in the wrong place, I did not realise they grew so tall. Paths are very appealing, a friend pointed out that we have several paintings of paths and we had never noticed it. Amelia

  5. I see things differently through the photos I’ve taken over the past two years, but walking around withOUT a camera in my hand is also an eye-opener! I love the distant view, as well as the foreground. But just as you adjust the focus with the camera on far and near objects, perhaps just one eye-catcher in between would be a good idea to make you focus there too. Look forward to seeing your ideas put into practice!

    • One factor is that this is really the only view OUT of the garden; the other boundaries have hedging and trees to protect us from the strong winds, so I think I have come to the same conclusion that it just needs a small ‘strongish stop’ before the view to lead to it but still make the garden important.

  6. Yes, the camera will see things I don’t! If I find myself avoiding something because it won’t look good in the picture, that tells me it needs to be changed. I agree with your assessment of paths!

    • Your woodland is full of inviting paths with tempting views through the trees and shrubs. So I know that you always think about these things when you are planning.

  7. I’m only now just catching up with you and I see you already answered a few of my questions, sorry! I like your plan to post on paths, I was going to ask how you like your gravel. It seems the perfect surface for your garden and climate but sometimes I hear people complain. I’m really leaning towards giving it a try here though.
    I don’t want to go on too long but I see what you mean about the distant view drawing your eye off. I love it and you’re right about removing part of the hedge to open it even more, but it is hard to pull your attention back into the garden. The only plant I immediately notice is the lone cypress. In the one picture your eye stops there and then there’s nothing else to go to, but I suspect it’s only the angle of the photo since the next one with a bit of path in it gives a completely different feel!
    Love your garden! In my own garden I only wish I could look at earlier pictures and use them to plan out changes, but alll my photos seem to do is remind me of things I changed which don’t look quite as nice anymore! -but I love the experimenting
    Frank

    • The second image with the pather is standing slightly to the left,so I may well move the path even if I don’t totaly change the layout of the two beds as described below. I’ll talk about the gravel soon, but I’m very happy with the choice, Frank.

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