The Crimson zone in June

It has been some time since I shared any images of the Crimson zone with you.

This small area is situated behind the Quercus ilex bushes that you can see at the top of the slope and the path that separates it from the large island.  

The colour emphasis came about originally by change but I have been adding suitable plants so that now this small area is saturated with colour.

I don’t irrigate this area unless the plants are very stressed so finding suitable plants hasn’t been that easy.  There is now quite a lot of shade here too as the Arbutus unedo has grown strongly; it needs to be pruned back into shape soon.

Lychnis coronaria and Achillea millefolium

Lychnis coronaria and Achillea millefolium

An unknown Hemerocallis and Achillea

An unknown Hemerocallis and Achillea

Lychnis coronaria and Achillea millefolium and Oleander

Lychnis coronaria and Achillea millefolium and Oleander

Oleander

Oleander

P1160317 blog

The Allium Sphaerocephalon were planted to contrast with Hemerocallis 'Stella d'Oro' but that finished flowering before the Allium began - "best laid plans of ......."

The Allium Sphaerocephalon were planted to contrast with Hemerocallis ‘Stella d’Oro’ but that finished flowering before the Allium began – “best laid plans of …….”

But then the Allium Sphaerocephalon gave a delightful combination with Teucrium hyrcanicum

But then the Allium Sphaerocephalon gave a delightful combination with Teucrium hyrcanicum

I have been given a lovely ground cover rose that would look wonderful here but that would need water, so at present it is still in its pot, still flowering profusely so I need to decide where to put it.

Do you have colour themed areas in your garden?  Do they remain the same colour through the seasons or do you plant so that they change from one period to the next?

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21 thoughts on “The Crimson zone in June

  1. The alliums look wonderful with the Teucrium. It’s a lovely contrast of flower shape, rather than the colour you were planning for. I do plan for colour schemes. We have the two black and white beds, for starters. The cottage garden has been planned for cool, pastel shades, while the grass garden, for the hotter colours. The woodland garden starts with typical spring planting and moves into blue and white. As one area fades, the other takes over.

  2. Your Allium and Teucrium look cool and soothing to the eye together – nice combination. And I love the pink Achillea in your first picture. I have lots of the same Lychnis as you this year, and let it more or less take over as it survives the heat so well, and the Achillea goes beautifully, so one to consider. I don’t actually have colour themes, but everything seems to be pink in one spot this year! With just a few splashes of yellow in between. I love that combination, although some people would say pink and yellow shouldn’t be together. It’s all a matter of personal choice, isn’t it!

  3. The Lychnis and yarrow look wonderful together, Christina. I know what you mean about the timing issues, though. I searched high and low for a Coreopsis to blend in with the red-orange Hemerocallis planted by a prior owner but it now seems that the Coreopsis will bloom a little late this year, while the Hemerocallis seems keen to finish up early. As the saying goes, the best laid plans of mice and (wo)men often go astray…

  4. Your purples and pinks go so well together and contrast with your euphorbia. I don’t really go for colour themed borders but there are two short borders each side of the grass path that leads to the circular lawn that seem to have made themselves into white borders. I think I will add more, they won’t match because one has sun all day, the other just has early morning sun, but it will be a challenge!

  5. I do like the allium with the Teucrium hyrcanicum. Looks like you have a large patch of them. I have in mind to create a red border but am too undisciplined to work on it formally. Do you find you have to deadhead the Lychnis? Mine goes to seed quickly then quits blooming unless I deadhead it a lot (which I don’t).

    • I don’t deadhead my Lychnis because there is quite a lot of it and I am too lazy! The Teucrium has self seeded so I now have a lot, I moved some to other places around the garden too. It is quite drought tolerant so I am happy to have it in various places.

  6. I like the idea of a crimson zone. One gardener referred to his red to purple border as “Blood & Guts”. That appealed to me. I’m always tweaking colors, primarily with foliage. Flowers are harder, needing to factor in bloom time and all, but I’m working on it.

  7. I also think the allium and teucrium combo is great! I never think to combine similar colors but different flower shapes, I’m lucky enough to get colors that don’t contrast horribly… but then again in my eyes any mix outside under the sun and sky can look fine together, I don’t worry too much.
    I do have a few areas which I try to limit to certain colors, it helps me narrow down where the new stuff goes, and helps to keep the hodgepodge under control!

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