September Evening Light

September is here and the hours of daylight are less, so all the more reason to enjoy the last rays of the sun as it slips away on the horizon.

It was hot yesterday with blue skies all day, it felt much more like a hot summer’s day than one in early autumn but the evening light declared itself as the moody light of autumn.  I want to share my swift walk around looking at the different beds and borders in the fast disappearing sunlight.

The edge of the upper drive border

The edge of the upper drive border

Garlic chives with Stipa tenuissima

Garlic chives with Stipa tenuissima

Garlic chives

Garlic chives

Sedum, Stipa and Verbena bonariensis

Sedum, Stipa and Verbena bonariensis

The terrace side of the Large Island

The terrace side of the Large Island

 A closer view of the terrace side of the Large Island

A closer view of the terrace side of the Large Island

Purple and silver

Purple and silver

Sedum Matrona

Sedum Matrona

Edge of the Large Island with the formal beds

Edge of the Large Island with the formal beds

Edge of the Large Island from the other direction looking towards the drive

Edge of the Large Island from the other direction looking towards the drive

Edge of the Large Island from the other direction looking towards the drive in more detail

Edge of the Large Island from the other direction looking towards the drive in more detail

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The small Island

The small Island

Sedum Matrona

Sedum Matrona

Seed heads Teucrium hyrcanicum

Seed heads Teucrium hyrcanicum

Teucrium hyrcanicum

Teucrium hyrcanicum, look at the beautiful spider’s web, another sure sign autumn is on the way

The back border aka the Spring Walk

The back border aka the Spring Walk

The back border aka the Spring Walk with Miscanthus

The back border aka the Spring Walk with Miscanthus

The Left hand border

The Left hand border

Mulberry always looks fabulous in the evening light

Mulberry always looks fabulous in the evening light

Asters have enjoyed the wetter summer

Asters have enjoyed the wetter summer

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Hibiscus, a beautiful double given to me by a friend sadly it has no name

Hibiscus, a beautiful double given to me by a friend sadly it has no name

Miscanthus and Pennisetum doing their wonderful autumn thing

Miscanthus and Pennisetum doing their wonderful autumn thing

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44 thoughts on “September Evening Light

  1. Beautiful photos, the evening light creates a magical effect but you have a magical garden in any light.
    We really enjoyed our day with you and the wonderful lunch. Thank you so much for your hospitality and for showing us the Etruscan tombs.

  2. I am glad you shared the evening light, it reminds me of some wonderful holidays. Your Sedum matrona is really beautiful and looks perfectly placed, I love that colour combination.

  3. The light really picks out the grasses doesn’t it, especially the Stipa. But I do love Miscanthus. I was at a pub by the sea today and they had planted it en masse surrounded by shingles. It looked, and sounded, so right.

  4. All your grasses really suit the late afternoon light. Your aster is lovely too – I don’t normally like asters, but that one is almost like a daisy. Do you know what variety it is?

    • Sorry the label was lost before I put all the plants in the spreed-sheet, I’ll ask a friend who used to have a nursery selling mainly Asters, I’m sure she’ll recognise it, it always flowers well.

  5. The light was perfect, what beautiful pictures you were able to capture! The grass really takes on a whole new dimension, I’m suddenly all for keeping it as is and not cutting it back! lol

  6. Wow, absolutely magical, Christina! The light makes all the difference in photography, doesn’t it. The planting is gorgeous and structurally strong. I love the sedum, silver foliage and grasses – Matrona always flops in my garden – soil to rich maybe. Do you know the name of the Aster? Very pretty!

    • Even my Matrona is opening up a bit because of the rain this year, usually it stays erect or I think it could be your rich soil or just the rain this year for you too. I’ll try to find the name of the Aster.

  7. I know that it was the best possible light to photograph a garden in but it all looks so beautiful Christina, such a harmony of colour and texture, the repeats create an almost ethereal effect.

    One thing that is really bugging me is how your stipa remain so wonderfully errect, maintaining that lovely vase-like shape, whilst mine just flop. It must be something to do with soil conditions, but I’m sure I didn’t have prostrate stipas in my previous garden, and I would have thought they would prefer the free draining soil here.

    • I cut back some of the Stipa early last month so mostly what you can see is new growth. Mine get huge and they do flop so it isn’t just yours and you’re right that you have great conditions for them now but there’s always going to be more rain in Wales so that they grow more. Mine usually grow in the winter and rest in the summer.

  8. Beautiful light. I noticed the other day just how early it is getting dark now. It’s a bit sad to feel that the light nights are now gone for another year. Still it’ll be nice to snuggle up in front of the fire. Do you find that weeds are a problem in your garden or does a dried climate mean you get fewer of them? Your garden looks so beautiful, I’m struggling to keep up with it all this summer. I might need to let the plot go.

    • The drought conditions in a ‘normal’ year do mean less weeds; I’ve noticed a huge amount more growing this year and having to cut the grass under the olives has been a chore that usually is done once or twice and that’s it until we harvest, but not this year!

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