The Slope on Thursday – November evening light

Obviously the evening light isn’t today Thursday!  Yesterday afternoon while I was ironing I noticed that the light was once again wonderful and wanted to capture the November light as I had done the light in October.  While I was outside with my camera, leaving the ironing to wait for a few minutes, I decided I would show the slope in this lovely clear light.

I always write a little about the weather in these Thursday posts; all I can say is that it has been very changeable AGAIN!  Last Friday was glorious, warm and sunny, the weekend showery with a few hours of pleasant sun; Monday it rained all day and was grey, Tuesday was cold and a mix of cloud and sun, Wednesday cold and sunny and this morning it is very cold, with a pale blue sky with pink on the horizon. The light is bright so if I had taken the photographs this morning they would have been similar to last week.

The usual view, most of the Perovskia has finished flowering but the odd plant is still producing some blue flowers to attract the bees

The usual view, most of the Perovskia has finished flowering but the odd plant is still producing some blue flowers to attract the bees

Almost time to remove the seed heads of the Verbascum, but they do look lovely silhouetted against the sky, especially when it is as blue as it was on Wednesday

Almost time to remove the seed heads of the Verbascum, but they do look lovely silhouetted against the sky, especially when it is as blue as it was on Wednesday

The Melia azedarach foliage turned yellow this week

The Melia azedarach foliage turned yellow this week

What is that red in the background? Behind the Persimmon that is tenaciously still hanging on to some of its leaves

What is that red in the background? Behind the Persimmon that is tenaciously still hanging on to some of its leaves

What is that red in the background?

What is that red in the background?

Cotoneaster, wow! Lots of berries this year!

Cotoneaster, wow! Lots of berries this year!

Last week I became aware of how much the trees had grown, making their presence felt; this week it is a shrub I had almost forgotten about that caught my attention – a cotoneaster that I planted perhaps four years ago at the top of the slope to act as part of the division between the slope and what I call the ‘upper slope path’.  The lovely red berries that I have been hoping to see have never been much in evidence; they may have been there and just not visible but look!  Lovely long arching branches covered with berries (and yes Cathy, some will find their way into a vase).

A lone flower of Lamprathus spectabilis peeps out from Euphorbia myrsinites foliage

A lone flower of Lamprathus spectabilis peeps out from Euphorbia myrsinites foliage

By the gate Euphorbia myrsinites and an Agave look blue in the evening light

By the gate Euphorbia myrsinites and an Agave look blue in the evening light

Variegated Agave with Euphorbia myrsinites

Variegated Agave with Euphorbia myrsinites

This is a miniature prickly pear, I don't think it has ever had so many fruits

This is a miniature prickly pear, I don’t think it has ever had so many fruits

Who says snails won't move across shark surfaces?  The needle like spines are very painful if I should happen to touch this plant by mistake, but the snail seems to be quite happy

Who says snails won’t move across shark surfaces? The needle like spines are very painful if I should happen to touch this plant by mistake, but the snail seems to be quite happy

A little blue sky makes so much difference to the colours of the Persimmon

A little blue sky makes so much difference to the colours of the Persimmon

 

A quick reminder that Saturday 22nd  is Garden Bloggers Foliage Day, I do hope you’ll join with me to celebrate some glorious autumn colour, or if you’re in the southern hemisphere some lovely green foliage that will remind us that when winter is past it will be spring again.  Just write and post is the usual way including a link to my post and leaving a comment with your link.  I will enjoy seeing what you have this month.

What colour is the sky where you are today?

Advertisements

29 thoughts on “The Slope on Thursday – November evening light

  1. I love being able to see the light where you are Christina, I can see why you put the ironing to one side. Can you eat Prickly Pear fruits, I did not realise either that there was a miniature version. The light here this lunchtime is just slightly hazy and blue but its warmer again after a 4c start this morning.

    • The temperature went down to 8°C in the greenhouse so I assume a little colder outside, it felt very cold, today warmed up beautifully and remained lovely all day. There are large prickly pears that grow just outside our gate, maybe I’ve never shown them, they are edible and delicious but you have to know how to prepare them other wise its needle-like spines in fingers or worse still in the mouth – that would be horrendous, maybe I’d need to go to hospital to remove them (I don’t this I am just surmising).

  2. Last year I put the prickliest berberis sprigs I could find around some of my mollusc vulnerable plants. And sharp gravel. It made not a jot of difference. Those slimy skins are thick as well.

    • Tough skinned indeed, the worst thing for me are the tiny, almost invisible hair like needles that if one gets into the skin are impossible to remove, I’ll have to check if the snail moves or just decides to stay where it is.

  3. What a difference the light makes to the spirits. It hardly got light at all yesterday and I couldn’t even get up any enthusiasm for my daily prowl. Today the sun has been shining and I have been out pottering for hours.
    Your prickly pear looks amazing so covered in fruit.

  4. We are back to summer again with bright blue skies and lunch on the patio. My cotoneasters are full of red berries this year but the Persimmon has not had a huge crop of fruit. I thought with this long spell of mild weather I would have a bumper crop this year. Amelia

  5. The blue sky makes a wonderful backdrop this week and the light makes everything pop. I will look forward to your foliage post but have family visiting and probably won’t be able to join in this time.

  6. Hi Christina. Yes, blue sky does make such a difference and that photo with the verbascum is lovely! We haven’t had much of that blue here recently, but today looks promising. The fog is lifting, so I’m hopeful!

  7. I love the tiny agaves Christina are they new as I do not remember seeing them before, I remember those beautiful big ones I saw on the Canary islands last January, the berries on your contoneaster will shine out in the sunlight and have nice foliage backgrounds to show them off, some shrubs and trees have to reach a certain size or age before they have flowers and seeds/berries, Frances

  8. I finally have some time to catch up on your blog, love the look of the garden in that autumn light!
    It’s great to be able to find surprises such as the cotoneaster, something that’s been there for a while and then suddenly comes into its own or makes its presence known. Then you can finally pat yourself on the back for your foresight!
    I have a few hardy cactus which have been in the same pots in the same spot for the last six years. Surprisingly enough they survive, but I just can’t commit to planting them out in the garden. The memory of those sharp little spines stuck in the skin for days does not make me want to put them anywhere which involves weeding.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s