GBFD – A frosty morning

Welcome to GBFD where I encourage you to value the foliage in your garden, and at this time of year maybe it is the foliage that is doing most of the work to make your garden beautiful.

Euphorbia myrsinites

Euphorbia myrsinites

Euphorbia myrsinites

Euphorbia myrsinites

Artemisia schmidtiana Nana hasn't like the wet weather this year causing black, dead patches, hopefully it won't mind the frost as much!

Artemisia schmidtiana Nana hasn’t like the wet weather this year causing black, dead patches, hopefully it won’t mind the frost as much!

Garlic is growing.  The white effect isn't chalk but frost on the ground

Garlic is growing. The white effect isn’t chalk but frost on the ground

Cerastium tomentosum

Cerastium tomentosum

Marrubium incanum

Marrubium incanum

A view of the upper slope path with just the flowers of Iris '

A view of the upper slope path with just the flowers of Iris ‘Pure as Gold’

I am in England now.  Last Monday I visited RHS Wisley, I think you might enjoy the ghostly but very beautiful views of the planting near the new glass house.  I love Wisley in winter, maybe even more than in summer. If you are ever closeby it is always worth popping in for even just a few moments of peace and tranquility.

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If you would like to join with me today in celebrating the foliage in your garden or indeed just one plant whose foliage is special at the moment, please include a link to this post in yours and add the link with your comment.

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40 thoughts on “GBFD – A frosty morning

    • Tina you are very welcome to GBFD thank you for joining in. Southern England doesn’t usually have very long periods of frost so I imagine the grass doesn’t have to be particularly frost resistant.

  1. The iris is lighting up the path with its bright yellow. It is a beautiful flower, I don’t expect any iris for a long time yet. Wisley is looking beautiful, it is very tempting but I don’t think I am going to have time to visit this year 😦 Amelia

  2. some lovely photos Christina, have a nice holiday, if the rain and wind stop for a while I’ll take and post some photos, I realised yesterday I have not yet taken any photos in December so I think I must find a break in the weather and take some, Frances

  3. The foliage that is snow covered or in a vase are my contribution this month Christina….we are in for a brief warm up and rain so I will see more green than white on Christmas. Actually we only have a dusting of white right now.

    I love your frosted foliage and I can see why you love RHS Wisley in winter….I hope to visit there someday.

  4. The frost-covered foliage is beautiful, Christina, as are the stark but peaceful winter scenes from Wisley. I hope you’re enjoying your yuletide trip. Best wishes for a very merry Christmas!

  5. It pains me to say it, but I haven’t been to Wisley since the building of the new glasshouse. There is always something to see, whatever the season.
    It’s been a little fraught lately so I will have to skip this month and join in again in January. My apologies. Have a lovely Christmas Christina.

  6. Once I realized it was GBFD, I wanted very much to finally begin posting today; and I am doing it despite only having one picture to share – the only acceptable result of a rapid trip round the garden with camera! I would wait till tomorrow, but I’ll be helping my mother, who has a hopefully very minor operation scheduled. And after all, a few rose leaves in December are special! I love all those frosty silvers you have – lovely soft hues. I would like to grow some marrubium myself, but it looks like I will have to order it in, which will run the price up quite a bit 😦 Does it grow well for you?
    Hope your trip is a lovely time!
    Here is the link to my post: http://smallsunnygarden.blogspot.com/2014/12/sunlight-and-red-leaves.html

    • Amy, thank you for joining in this month, it is lovely to see new people joining in. The Marrubium was bought as a plant but has since produced lots of seedlings so I have lots around the garden now. I can try to collect some seed for you next year if you like and send them to you. Happy Christmas, Christina.

      • I’d be thrilled to have seeds from the Marrubium – if that works out for you 🙂 I’m still trying to learn when to start seeds here, but I think I’m making some progress 😉 Have a wonderful Christmas!

    • I used to live about 30 minutes away from Wisley so was able to visit in all the different seasons. I didn’t have long last Monday but I really enjoyed the area around the new glass house. I found some seeds I had been looking for too, so a great morning. Thanks for joining in GBFD so consistently over the year.

      • Glad you had time for a visit, albeit rushed – at least knowing the gardens you will know which bits you particularly want to target. I really have learned from foliage day so am very grateful to you for hosting 🙂

  7. I would dearly like to grow euphorbias but my skin will not permit 😦 How encouraging to see those green shoots of garlic coming through the ground Christina. I’m late with planting mine so must do so early in January.

  8. Beautiful pictures of the frost, it really does bring out the detail of the leaves… and the iris is still such a nice fresh touch!
    I just wasn’t able to get out for pictures this month, even though the snow has melted back enough for some foliage to come out once again. maybe January 🙂

    • You really mustn’t feel pressured into participating in GBFD, Frank. I’m glad the snow has melted for a while, at least so you can enjoy seeing some greenery. Have a really Happy Christmas and a great gardening year in 2015.

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