Tuesday view – 28th June 2016

The past week it has become hot!  Summer arrived with a bang and not gently the way I would prefer.  I’m joining Cathy at Words and Herbs to show the same view each week to be able to see the changes (or not) that occur during the year.

Tuesday view 28th June 2016

Tuesday view 28th June 2016

Lychnis coronaria looks a little scorched, I don't think there will be many more flowers now.

Lychnis coronaria looks a little scorched, I don’t think there will be many more flowers now.

Left foreground, Lamprathus spectabilis threads its way the silver foliage of a variety of Artemesia (I think)

Left foreground, Lamprathus spectabilis threads its way the silver foliage of a variety of Artemesia (I think)

An unnamed Hemerocallus with huge yellow flowers is responding to the weeks of rain by performing brilliantly

An unnamed Hemerocallus with huge yellow flowers is responding to the weeks of rain by performing brilliantly

This Hemerocallis in the background behind the Cotinus is in the Upper Slope Path bed

Yellow Hemeraocallis given to me as a gift when I bought a lot of plants from them

Yellow Hemeraocallis given to me as a gift when I bought a lot of plants from them

Allium sphaerocephalon returns each year and will even seed around, the one of the few Alliums that will do that here; with Schizachyrium scoparium

Allium sphaerocephalon returns each year and will even seed around, the one of the few Alliums that will do that here; with Schizachyrium scoparium Front right foreground.

The sky is an even more intense blue this week, the silver foliage plants are sparkling except for the Lychnis which doesn’t cope as well with the heat as you’d imagine.

Visit Cathy to see who else is sharing a view this week.

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16 thoughts on “Tuesday view – 28th June 2016

  1. It must be really hot if your Lychnis is singed…. I found that was the only plant surviving our hot dry summer last year. I love the silvery Artemisia with that pink flower Lamprathus, which is new to me. Must take a closer look at that. Thanks for joining me Christina and hope you are coping with the heat!

    • I think the Lychnis would just like a bit heavier soil, it will come back but they always look ragged in summer. I get up early to do what needs to be done and sleep or rest on the afternoon. I don’t like the heat.

  2. Nice to have some Alliums that spread around. I have difficulty getting them to grow here. I just cut back my lychnis by 1/2 to try to get it blooming again, but it usually just dies back in the heat as well. Lovely blue sky accenting your view today.

  3. Christina maravillosos Hemerocallis amarillos. Florecen ahora con el calor que tienes. Los Allium cada año vuelven a crecer más, es fantástico. La Artemisa con su follaje plateado es preciosa. Todas las plantas son muy bonitas y el cielo azul magnífico, aunque haga mucho calor como aquí. A mí tampoco me gusta el calor. Gracias por enseñarnos tus preciosas flores, incluido el Lychnis que todavía tiene flores. Saludos de Margarita.

      • Christina gracias por tu interés. Estoy en Madrid a 38 grados Centigrados por el día y a 21 grados Centígrados por la noche. En la casa de campo la temperatura bajaría mínimo 10 grados Centígrados. Madrid es la capital de España y es una ciudad muy grande con muchos coches y hace mucho calor en Verano y mucho frío en Invierno. Saludos de Margarita.

        • I knew Madrid was very cold in winter, we visited in March many years ago and it was still cold and I knew the summers were hot; I can understand why you would want a house in the country where the temperatures are more enjoyable.

    • I wish that were true Kris but like your plants I think the rain has initiated a lot of new sappy growth that will just burn in the sun; I hope that the new plants have put down roots and not just top growth.

  4. I would plant far too many Italian cypress if I gardened in your climate. They really accent the view in my opinion. Hang in there with the heat, I hope those cool stone walls are protecting you from the brunt of it during the heat of the day.
    I think I’m the only American who isn’t crazy about daylilies…..

    • Cypresses are the trees of Tuscany but lots of people now grow them here in Lazio too now; out tree is really the Umbrella Pine but that causes many problems not least of which is that it is very shallow rooted and it destroys roads, pavements and terraces if planted close to them. I haven’t always liked Day Lilies but they survive and are one of the things which flower slightly later than mid spring so I’ve grown to appreciate them.

  5. I’m rather envious of your self-seeding drumstick alliums! Day lilies remain sadly underrated in the UK, a shame really because here there’s a late summer perennial flowering gap too. Late flowering types are less likely to suffer from the nasty gall midge, is it a problem in Italy?

    • I’ve not come across the gall midge Kate, thank goodness. Even though they don’t flower in late summer they do flower after the irises and roses so are the main flowering plant at the moment in my garden.

  6. I am not sure I have come across Lamprathus before – what sort of plant is it? Interesting about the alliums – a number of A Hair are flowering here this year and I haven’t had them in the garden for several years so it has taken the seeds all this time to grow into bulbs mature enough to flower.

    • Lamprathus isn’t an invasive non native succulent. You can’t see any of its foliage in yesterday’s post. I have shown it before. It is one of the few things that will flower in summer.

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