Catch-up time again 8th September

My last post was IaVoM last week!!  Last week was hectic but culminated in a wonderful few days on the Amalfi coast.  The weather was perfect for our trip and when we returned on Tuesday evening it was to find that the temperatures had dropped significantly; Wednesday the high only reached the low 20’s°C that’s 10° C at least lower than it has been.  Today is warm again but I can see that the plants know that cooler weather is coming soon and there was visibly more growth on herbs like basil.  I’ll try to write a post soon about which plants have come through this summer and what I’ve learned about how they survive.

But for today here are two of the vases I created yesterday with flowers that were desperate to be picked.

Another green, white and pale yellow vase for the mantle in the sitting room

Another green, white and pale yellow vase for the mantle in the sitting room

All the flowers are Zinnias including Z. 'polar Bear', Z. Green Envy and a pale yellow from the mixed seed pack

All the flowers are Zinnias including Z. ‘polar Bear’, Z. Green Envy and a pale yellow from the mixed seed pack

Foliage was provided by Bells of Ireland and some pruned stems of Lonicera

Foliage was provided by Bells of Ireland and some pruned stems of Lonicera

For the sideboard more yellow Zinnias, Sunflowers and Rudbeckia

For the sideboard more yellow Zinnias, Sunflowers and Rudbeckia

This jolly vase makes me smile every time I pass it

This jolly vase makes me smile every time I pass it

If you haven’t checked out Cathy at (Rambling in the garden)’s In a vase on Monday post do visit to see what she has created (it certainly made me think of autumn) and some spring flowers from fellow bloggers in the Southern Hemisphere.

The images for the Tuesday view were taken yesterday, Wednesday.  Thanks Cathy at Words and Herbs for hosting and encouraging us to study one view every week to note its changes.

Tuesday View

Tuesday View

A little more colour from the pick flowers of the Sedums – I need more of these as they are the only flowering plant thriving in the heat.

More of the pink flowers are opening on Sedum 'Purple Emperor'

More of the pink flowers are opening on Sedum ‘Purple Emperor’

and in the background Sedum 'Matrona'

and in the background Sedum ‘Matrona’

The cooler days have encouraged a flower on the Cistus

The cooler days have encouraged a flower on the Cistus

I’m working my way through the posts I’ve missed; my apologies for not always commenting in the last couple of weeks; hopefully things will be back to normal next week.

Have a lovely weekend.

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29 thoughts on “Catch-up time again 8th September

  1. Your view does look different with the added colour and less bright sunlight. I love my sedums too. I have in fact planted more, but the ones given me from established plants from neighbours seem to do much better than any I have bought since. I saw Matrona in England, in a lush green English border… it didn’t look right somehow. But yours fits in very well with the grasses and silvery foliage.

    • The Bells of Ireland were sown 22nd of February and germinated in 3 days. I planted them out on 21st April. The plants aren’t very tall; not like the ones I saw Monty Don had grown on Gardeners’ world. I might try sowing some this autumn. I have tried drying some too.

  2. The noticeable drop in temperature seems to have suited your garden as well as yourself – it has been very humid here the last few days although not especially sunny and the nights have been uncomfortably warm again. Rain by the weekend hopefully! I love both your almost monochromatic vases, but especially the first one with the zinnias – the white vase is perfect for them. Do tell us more about your molucella – I tried it once but I only had tiny plants – and which zinnias you favour

    • I love all the Zinnias I’ve grown and I may even grow some shorter varieties next year for pots around the terrace. I wouldn’t say the Molucella are a big success; the plants aren’t tall the way I’ve seen them on Gardeners’s world for instance. They also have a weird smell that I’m not sure I like very much; I’ll probably use up the rest of the seed in the packet next year but I won’t buy any more unless they are much taller and more prolific. They were sown 22nd of February and germinated in 3 days. I planted them out on 21st April.

  3. Lovely vases, Christina. Your sunny one makes me smile, too. 🙂 Your Tues./Wed. view is looking nice with the silver and burgundy amid the soft grasses. Definitely tough and hardy plants!

  4. I hope the cooler weather takes hold for both of us soon, Christina. Your cutting garden continues to prove its value – both vases are wonderful. I really hope I can do more with the area I’ve allocated to cut flowers next year but I do something to discourage the raccoons if I’ve ever to have much success there.

  5. I love the soft autumn colours in your Tuesday views; the dusky pinks of the sedums blend so nicely with the grasses 🙂
    Both your lovely vases prove the value of zinnias, which I tend to overlook. How long does the rudbeckia last for you? I find that it might be an option here…

    • The Rudbeckia needs irrigation, it wouldn’t survive here if it wasn’t in the cut flower beds, and even then it doesn’t grow very tall, maybe the temperatures are just too much for it.

  6. Gorgeous Tuesday views! Sedum is a plant I am beginning to love. In the past it did not interest me much, but I really appreciate its ability to survive our heat and to pump out flowers. Yours are lovely. I also love your Bells of Ireland!

  7. I wanted to increase my Sedums this year and I was given a fair number by a friend in the autumn. I had hoped to prepare better sites for them but by the time they appeared this year it was too hot to transplant them. I’ll be interested in the plants that you think have survived best in the heat and sun. Amelia

    • Sedum are really easy to propagate; I’ll include a link in my next post. as we’ve now had some rain I should write about what’s survived and what failed to come through summer this year.

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