Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day – After the rains came!

Welcome to Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day where I ask you to look at and appreciate your foliage more.  I’m always glad when bloggers that I follow mention that they have been inspired to consider the benefits that good foliage bestows after reading about my approach to foliage.  It isn’t that I don’t want flowers, it is that those flowers usually need the support of good foliage and structural planting to show themselves at their best.

When I just reread August’s GBFD post I could see that many plants were at maximum stress levels and if the rain hadn’t fallen I think many would not have survived for very much longer.  But the rain has come and a lot of rain at that – The plants and I signed a deep sigh of relief and they and I feel much better.  I feel energised; it is cool enough to actually go outside and work in comfort.

The attraction of dead seed-heads, that I love to see in English gardens in winter, here just depress me and make me think of the heat of mid-summer so I have been removing all signs of them, just doing this makes the garden look more green.

The are flowers in amongst the evergreens - Sedum adds a splash of welcome colour at this time of year

The are flowers in amongst the evergreens – Sedum adds a splash of welcome colour at this time of year

The Perovskia that you can see grew from pieces of root left in the ground when the formal borders where replaced last autumn.  I don’t have the heart to remove them when they flower with just the smallest amount of water.

The evergreen borders planted last year have an inch or so of new growth already, the rain triggers immediate growth, it is astonishing!

The evergreen borders planted last year have an inch or so of new growth already, the rain triggers immediate growth, it is astonishing!

The silvery leafed lavender was also part of the previous planting, new growth has almost covered the dead looking stems that where exposed when neighbouring plants were removed, so they will also earn their place in the new planting, I have already planted other lavenders in these beds.

View of the upper Drive border, in the foreground some thyme might not have survived

View of the upper Drive border, in the foreground some thyme might not have survived

I won’t remove the dead looking thyme yet as there is still a possibility that it will re-shoot from the base – I do hope so.

The clipped Cistus that had lost leaves to conserve water have new growth and are adding the structure I love

The clipped Cistus that had lost leaves to conserve water have new growth and are adding the structure I love

The view from the Terrace looking west, I love seeing clouds like these, they usually mean there will be some rain

The view from the Terrace looking west, I love seeing clouds like these, they usually mean there will be some rain

Can you see the tiny bright emerald green grass in the field beyond the garden?  That’s a real indication of how the rain works its magic.

A closer look at the view looking west

A closer look at the view looking west

The Arbutus that was planted two years ago struggled and still needs irrigation in dry weather but slowly it is adding some new leaves, I don’t know how long it will take to actually be covered in foliage; it is proof of the fact that smaller trees establish more quickly and often catch up in size to a larger specimen – so why didn’t I plant a smaller specimen? Who knows?  Maybe there wasn’t a small specimen available as a standard tree.

Please feel free to write about your foliage in any way that works for you; I’ve shown many wide shots this month but you might prefer to zoom in to detailed leaf patterns, or maybe you could share a tree that is changing to a wonderful colour.  I look forward to reading your foliage posts each month and marvel at the different approaches.  To share pleases leave a link to and from this post.

Christina

 

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45 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day – After the rains came!

  1. It looks so much better with the water, I’m really looking forward to seeing it grow in again over the next few weeks!
    I’m going to try and see if I can round up a post this month. I always enjoy them but the months creep up so quickly that GBFD always seems to come out of nowhere!

  2. Pingback: Ignore the Flowers Day: September, 2016 – gardeninacity

    • I think if the Perovskia is in conditions it likes it might grow back from the roots. I removed mine when the ground was very dry and so a lot of roots remained in the ground but not many have regrown. Thanks for participating in GBFD every month Pauline.

    • I try to choose drought tolerant plants but that doesn’t mean that they ‘like’ drought, as soon as the rain comes they look much better, in the same way that Mediterranean style gardens in free draining soil in the UK look better in summer than my garden which is always very annoying.

    • You are kind to say ‘wonderful’ but in many places there are gaps where herbaceous plants went into summer dormancy and haven’t yet responded to the rain, they are slower to respond than the evergreens interestingly. Thanks for participating in GBFD.

  3. So lovely-especially the drive border and I was fascinated to read your comment on seed heads. I can imagine that seeing them in a drought and in intense heat would not lift the spirits and I tend to regularly dead head here to keep some order. But I visited Piet Oudolph’s planting at Hauser and Werth in Somerset this week which is awe inspiring. He has chosen plants that at this time of year display spectacular seed heads as part of the design. I concluded that it works when the planting is in groups of twenty or so and when planted next to a more vibrant other group still in full bloom. It’s easier to achieve in our wet and warm climate and in a vast space entirely dedicated to this style of planting-no trees and no shrubs- simply a palette of herbaceous plants.

    • I love Piet’s designs and I did start with the idea of using some of that style in the garden but as you say his designs depend on lower temperatures and more water. I do leave the Sedum seed-heads through winter and any grasses that still look good. I may regret cutting everything back but I was just completely fed up with the bleached look. I’m longing to visit the garden at Hauser and Werth, I’ve read many good reviews.

  4. Pingback: GBFD: Bordering on the Splendid | Rambling in the Garden

  5. Christina su jardín está precioso y verde después de las lluvias. Es increible como se ha recuperado de rápido. Yo no le muestro este año mi jardín porque llegamos aquí el 13 de Agosto y he tenido que quitar la mayoría de las vivaces ahogadas y muertas por las malas hierbas que medían más de 1 metro y 50 centímetros. Igual les ha pasado a los arbustos y a los rosales que han enfermado de roya. He tenido que arrancar hasta Lavandas grandes. Ha sido un desastre. El año que viene espero mostrarla un jardín al menos con flores y arbustos aunque sean recién plantados. Saludos de Margarita.

  6. That new border is coming along well – good to see its progess. We know what a difference rain makes in the UK after a dry spell but of course that benefit is magnified hugely in hotter areas – no wonder you are relieved. It is good to see the evidence of this – the changes evident in your Tuesday view photographs have been a delight to see. My foliage appreciation post is here: https://ramblinginthegarden.wordpress.com/2016/09/22/gbfd-bordering-on-the-splendid/

  7. Pingback: Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day: September 2016 | A Walk in the Garden

  8. Pingback: Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day | Eliza Waters

  9. It’s wonderful to see the plants respond to rain 🙂 we are finally getting a little – just a little, but it makes such a difference! Do you find that thyme is a bit fragile in drought? My lemon thyme has been the least sturdy of my Mediterranean-origin herbs; I am curious what your experience with it may be. It’s good to see your Perovskia; mine has been quite wispy, and I think our desert climate is pushing it a little too far. It can hardly be called a structural plant in my border! But it still does much for the garden, so it is staying for now!
    I hope to have my post up tomorrow; I have all the pictures but let the camera battery run completely down… heigh-ho…!

  10. Pingback: GBFD September ’16 « sorta like suburbia

  11. I am still waiting for cooler weather and rain. Your garden looks refreshed and is a wonderful testament to the beauty of foliage. I love the photos showing the bright blue sky with puffy clouds!

  12. I’ve been wondering how you like the new plantings and just read through the comments where you said the garden is much more inviting now. I love the new look. The rains have come here also and it feels so much better to see the green returning.

  13. I’m glad to hear you’ve finally had a good soaking. What a difference it makes and I agree that just looking at all the dried and faded seedheads is just too depressing.
    We are seeing an entirely different change here, one which is more like going to sleep rather than waking up but I guess to each his own… or something like that. Honestly I much prefer the waking up part!
    Here’s my contribution, thanks for hosting 🙂
    https://katob427.wordpress.com/2016/10/22/gbfd-october-16/

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