Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day – Autumn has arrived

Welcome to Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day where I share with you my belief that to have a garden that pleases you all year foliage must be a major consideration when choosing plants.

The walnut trees in the garden lost their leaves at the end of September but because we have had so much rain all the other trees have retainedĀ their foliage until now; however with falling light levels and shorter day lengths all the deciduous trees are changing in colour and with a slight breeze the leaves are falling.

Some of the wisteria foliage is changing colour on top of the pergola but all you can see here has remained green

Some of the wisteria foliage is changing colour on top of the pergola but all you can see here has remained green

I’d be quite happy if the wisteria did lose its leaves now as it is blocking the light into the kitchen now.

Euphorbia rigida perfect in all seasons

Euphorbia rigida perfect in all seasons

This morning I found lots of seedlings of the Euphorbia in the gravel which I’ll be potting up as they are always useful in all areasĀ of the garden.

Looking across the evergreen borders to the yellow foliage of the Pomegranate

Looking across the evergreen borders to the yellow foliage of the Pomegranate

In the foreground is Arbutus unedo with flowers and fruits

The butter yellow leaves of the Pomegranate are the focus of the garden today

The butter yellow leaves of the Pomegranate are the focus of the garden today

Butter yellow leaves of the Pomegranate show to perfection against the cypress

Butter yellow leaves of the Pomegranate show to perfection against the cypress

20 to 30 cm of new growth on Quercus ilex

20 to 30 cm of new growth on Quercus ilex

The edge of the evergreen borders, I will prune into shape in early spring

The edge of the evergreen borders, I will prune into shape in early spring

The Melia again with underneath a few repeat flowering Hemerocallis 'Sol d'Oro'

The Melia with underneath a few repeat flowering Hemerocallis ‘Sol d’Oro’

Melia adzadarec leaves are beginning to fall

Melia azedarach leaves are beginning to fall

The Melia berries are colouring yellow as is some of the foliage

The Melia berries are colouring yellow as is some of the foliage

The view from the terrace looking west remains quite constant

The view from the terrace looking west remains quite constant

Tuesday View is all form and foliage structure this month

Tuesday View is all form and foliage structure this month

this morning I found this fungus growing on some fallen leaves and on moss covered tuff.

Any ideas what this fungi might be

Any ideas what this fungi might be?

It is also worryingly growing on the base of Rosa mutabilis

The fungus is on the trunk of Rosa mutablis too so I'm a bit worried it might be harmful

The fungus is on the trunk of Rosa mutabailis too so I’m a bit worried it might be harmful

You join with GBFD please just link to and from this post; I look forward to seeing what foliage you have today.

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38 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day – Autumn has arrived

    • The second spring is still happening here Sue, on a walk this morning I saw new flowers of the wild carrot, poppies and blue chicory among others. As I get so little autumn colour because of the lack of low night time temperatures (not that I’m complaining about that) and plant that does colour tends to get my appreciation.

  1. What a lovely garden you have !!! I envy you for the Cypress tree’s, we can’t keep them here . The Euphorbia belongs to a huge family, I have them outside in the garden as well as inside in my succulent collection, they are rather easy plants I think.

  2. Pingback: Garden Bloggers Foliage Day: The Gingerbread Boy | Rambling in the Garden

  3. Christina the Glycine with the green leaves at the end of November is amazing. The precious Euphorbia. The Granado has the foliage a beautiful color that contrasts with the wonderful Cypress. The Melia tree is beautiful. The View of Tuesday has some forms and colors that form magnificent living sculptures. The garden is beautiful. Greetings from Margarita.

      • It’s not nice things Christina, it’s the truth. It has a wonderful garden and as a gift this year is really beautiful in November and the Wisteria had to have lost the whole leaf very late in late October. Greetings from Margarita.

  4. I particularly appreciated the photographs of the Melia azedarach, I cannot remember seeing such a close up one before. It is really lovely. I had not thought of the lovely yellow colour of a pomegranate in Autumn. I’m looking more closely at the autumn colours now and it is not only the typical “autumn” plants that have lovely colour changes. Amelia

  5. As usual your garden is a beautiful medley of foliage. The Tuesday view in particular looks so fresh and autumnal, not dry or tired like it was leaning towards at the end of summer. I especially like the colors of the grasses… and the rosemary of course!

  6. Your Pomegranate tree is beautiful. I have a little Melia tree grown from a berry I collected in Greece a few years ago. Seeing your huge tree makes me realise that I shall have problems with trying to keep my poor tree in captivity in the greenhouse.
    You have designed your garden beautifully so that you have lovely foliage all year round.

    • When I planted the Melia nine years ago it was a seedling from a friend; about 80 cm tall with a ‘trunk’ about as thick as my index finger. I laughed at myself for thinking I would see a tree – it is the fastest growing tree I have ever seen,

  7. Beautiful color from both the Melia and pomegranate! There is little color change here so far as our temperatures are only beginning to really drop now. I am still feeling guilty for not giving our pomegranate better care through last summer; there is no crop this year here either, but from lack of water, not abundance… Though late, I went ahead and posted for GBFD today: a short look at the new growth of some otherwise familiar foliage: http://www.smallsunnygarden.com/2016/11/23/silver-to-green/

    • The lack of pomegranates on my tree is from lack of water during the 2 month drought, the rain arriving just made the all tiny fruits split; it was a shame as in spring there were huge numbers of flowers. thanks for the contribution to GBFD this month.

  8. I love the foliage of that pomegranate. The whole garden looks beautiful, Christina! I’ve heard tales of the self-seeding proclivities of Euphorbia rigida but apparently the plants in my garden aren’t inclined to get with that program.

  9. I love the pomegranite as a focal point, and the lovely evergreens in the background which give your garden its characteristic flair. The Tuesday view is looking very fresh (and tidy!). I will have to get a shot of mine now it is in its late autumn/early winter state.

  10. That golden foliage of the pomegranate tree is simply stunning. The garden is looking beautiful Christina. I love the little euphorbia. I’ve seen that kind of fungus before. We cleared every scrap of the foliage away and pruned back the shrub to let more light and air in. Mulched with gravel and thankfully it don’t come back. Good luck with yours. All the best. Karen

    • Thanks for the advice Karen; I might try cleaning the fungus off first as it is on the one of the main stems of a Rosa mutabilis and if I pruned it, half the bush would be gone. But I will keep a close eye on it.

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