Afternoon light in winter

For the past few days the light in the afternoon has been different from the rest of the day and different from other times of year.  As I write on Friday afternoon at 5 pm the wind is blowing a gale and hail is hitting the west and north-west facing windows; it is very nearly dark now.  On Wednesday I managed to brave the cold to take a few photographs.

The colours were so strange, the light making everything almost a mono tone.

The colours were so strange, the light making everything almost a mono tone.

The Woodland walk path waiting for better weather to be completed

The Woodland walk path waiting for better weather to be completed

Two lemons that I couldn't fit into the greenhouse I wrapped in fleece - this morning the wind was so strong I found that this heavy pot had been blown over!

Two lemons that I couldn’t fit into the greenhouse I wrapped in fleece – this morning the wind was so strong I found that this heavy pot had been blown over!

Looking across the semi-circle to the Left hand border

Looking across the semi-circle to the Left hand border

When the light catches Miscanthus sin. 'Morning Light' it becomes magical

When the light catches Miscanthus sin. ‘Morning Light’ it becomes magical

From by the fig tree looking across the garden to the greenhouse

From by the fig tree looking across the garden to the greenhouse

As it has been too cold to be outside for long I've been warm in the kitchen experimenting with new bread recipes

As it has been too cold to be outside for long I’ve been warm in the kitchen experimenting with new bread recipes

What do you do when you can’t be outside in the garden?  Have a lovely weekend.

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48 thoughts on “Afternoon light in winter

  1. So beautiful to see the light…and a contrast to think of those beautiful scenes now dark and being pelted with hail this evening. Hope everything survives well. I am looking out the window at a cold rows of snow covered lavender we never pruned back this fall.

  2. I can see what you mean about the light – it makes everything appear a bit stark. I hope the cold and wind abates soon, allowing you more time outdoors. I’ve been confined indoors most of the week myself, partly due to heavy rain (yay!) but in larger part to a miserable head cold accompanied by a racking cough (no fun). If I had more energy I’d give the house a thorough new year’s cleaning but I don’t so I’m spending time reading (currently, “Rules of Civility” by Amor Towles).

  3. Again, the fluffy plumes of the miscanthus leap out like a beacon, just the sort of thing to lure us outside. Your homemade bread looks so delicious, perhaps I ought to abandon my winter reading to try making some myself? (Top of my pile is Ross King’s Mad Enchantment, about Monet’s obsession with and painting of the Water Lilles. )

  4. Great view of the miscanthus with olive trees in the background. The quality of the daylight makes such a huge difference. I love the yellowish tones of winter, so long as the skies are blue! Your loaf looks delicious. Sadly my tendency is to make cakes.

  5. I love to see the pictures of your woodland walk, whatever the light 😉 Yesterday and today (Fri/Sat) I paricularly noticed the light here as it was so bright and clear – blue skies and few clouds but of course cold (and a touch of snow on Fri am). This year I really want to be more adventurous with my bread – but at least I did make a different shape this week! It’s partly a matter of remembering to buy the extras to add into a different recipe of course – what was in yours?

    • The plait was from a Paul Hollywood book that I’m working my way through to try to try every recipe. This was with blue cheese (recipe called for Stilton) and walnuts; it was really good with a lovely texture. I make all our bread as we don’t like the local bread which is made without salt so goes really hard in a few hours. I like that everywhere sells fresh yeast here which I much prefer using. I think I prefer fruit loaves to cake (well almost).

      • PH’s 100 Best Breads perhaps? I made ‘farl’ from that book this week, but the mushroom and onion focaccia from a couple of weeks back was especially yummy 🤔 Good idea to work through the book – I started doing that with James Morton’s bread book but it’s too easy to get stuck on favourites! Will try to do the same again

        • Yes, that’s the one! I bought it at RHS Rosemoore in December 2015. I do tend to repeat the ones I like but as I especially like baking when it is as cold as it is now I’ve started trying new recipes again. the rye bread with cumin is also a favourite. I found the croissants just too rich and buttery, but I’d like to find a good recipe for them.

        • I will look out the rye and cumin one but will have to buy in some rye flour. I also make sourdough bread but I don’t think there are any sourdough recipes in this book

        • I have a friend who has a theory that the really good sourdough always comes from places close to the sea. Having tried various loaves I think he may have a point.

        • A sourdough starter varies considerably from place to place because of the different yeasts and bacteria in the atmosphere so this may well be the case – something to do with the salt perhaps?

        • And I haven’t made croissants before but I guess the buttery-ness is part of what they are. I will see if James Morton includes them in his book though

  6. Christina plants look like they have not suffered damage from the intense cold and snowfall. The light is different, magical: it gives a color the precious photos very special. The Miscanthus with the light that traverses its “white feathers” is wonderful. That bread is saying eat me! She’s a great cook. When I can not leave the house I read, I order the papers and the bills, I order my table and I put on the Internet to look for the things that I am pointing at a list and that I do not have time on a daily basis. Shelter well and keep warm. Greetings from Margarita.

    • Paperwork is something I need to catch up on too Margarita – this week I have promised myself to file everything that has been waiting for a while. What do you like to read?

      • Christina I like to read the classics of the realist novel of late 19th century Russians like Tolstoy, Dostoyevski ….. I also like Benito Perez Galdós much of the same time but Spanish. Hemingway, another favorite. Gabriel García Marquez and Mario Vargas Llosa are passionate about me. And other authors who are not famous. And of course books about plants, gardens, bulbs and everything related to gardening and organic farming. Christina, what do you like to read? Greetings from Margarita.

  7. Lovely photos in the winter light, reminds me that winter does have a beauty all of its own……”Morning light” looks interesting, and might grow for me in Canberra…

  8. The light before a storm is often quite spectacular isn’t it. So you got the wind too, but thankfully not the snow! Hope all your plants are safe. We are set to get more cold – permafrost for the next two weeks…

  9. Not sure it is a monotone view , looks rather good still. When it’s cold outside I catch up on things I don’t get time for such as painting, decorating, making marmalade and this year, archiving slides.

  10. Here we have been having a few days with a bright low sunshine that makes me look at things differently. Colours are much clearer, even the low tide mud in the river acquires a gleaming surface.

    • Usually the low angle of light adds colour here but this week it seems stark and totally without colour almost as in high summer but different somehow. Difficult to describe

  11. Very attractive range of colours – greens, greys, silver – and some lovely shapes in your garden. Winter is in some ways a beautiful time, especially for the trees, whose structure and intricacy are revealed when the leaves have gone. My favourite winter walk in London is along the Thames to Chiswick especially to view the trees right by the river. When the weather is bad in Cairo, I’m usually chopping veg and fruit waste for the compost, or sorting out my chaotic seed collection and cleaning tools, or making marmalade – or planning my next garden moves!

  12. Your garden still looks so tempting as the chill winds do not show up in photographs. I have lots of ideas for inside activities for the coming cold spell, I just hope I get round to them. Amelia

  13. Love the look of the miscanthus, the surrounding evergreens really set it off!
    I’ve been spending wasting way too much time on silly websites and nonsense computer games. The weather is so in between here that I can’t decide if I need to be in winter mode or get something done outside mode… so I do neither.

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