Frilled Tulips

I noted when I uploaded the photos from the last two days that I had taken 92 images almost all of them TULIPS!

Too many? Yes, maybe, but as the real proclaimers of spring I wait expectantly from the moment I plant them (almost form the moment I place the order) to see if they are as beautiful as I had hoped the day I walked around the garden deciding what to plant where; I should write this down as I forget when the box arrives and I waste time checking what each will look like before committing them to the ground.  At least last autumn because I knew I would be writing about them for this blog I did write down where I had placed each variety.

Several visitors to the garden have commented on the beauty of the frilled varieties I have.  My Italian friends had never seen anything like them before, today I will share them with you.

T. White Swan

Here, open in the sun

White Swan is very crisp and a pure, pure white.  These are planted in the raised bed on the east side of the house.

T. Lambada

Lambada is unbelievably beautiful, described in the catalogue as rhodonite red, margins chine yellow.  I choose them to plant with Rosa mutabilis as the colours should be the same, but I didn’t plant them together but instead with yellow Hemerocallis Sol d’oro

T. Blue Heron

Blue Heron is maybe a little insipid in the strong sunshine we’ve had for the last 10 days.  (It’s been so hot that the solar panel heats the water to 55° C – I have to be very careful when I turn the tap on to wash my hands). It is planted just off the path between the large island and the upper side of the slope border.

T. Red Hat

Red Hat is placed on the slope, beneath the Persimmon tree amongst seedling of Euphorbia which will cover the dying foliage of the tulips later on I hope.

Last year I loved Burgundy Lace for its colour and for the fact that it last for a long time and even as it died it retained its colour and so seemed to be still blooming.  This year I planted more but they aren’t quite open yet and not many of last year’s have repeat flowered; this may be due to the fact that some perennials have spread to cover where they were.

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Christina.
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Content created by Christina for
My Hesperides Garden.

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