In a vase on Monday- Keeping it simple

Monday is here again and time to look for something, from the garden, to put in a vase to join with Cathy at Rambling in the garden.

Over the weekend I was sure that this would be the week when I should put together something with the seed heads I have collected over the last few weeks; but when I went into the greenhouse this morning to check on germination of the seeds sown last week I realised that I really needed to pick some of the Ami majus which is growing like crazy, despite having been cut back and is demanding water as if it were an aquatic plant!  As there are 24 9cm pots and I am going to need the pots and the space soon I am debating planting some out, what is there to lose?  If 8 die, I’ll still have too many and I have sown more seed too. Continue reading

GBBD – May Profusion

I usually try to post every bloom there is in the garden for GBBD (for my own record of what is flowering if nothing else), but I’m beaten today!  There are just too many flowers and to be truthful even though I love every single bloom it is the overall effect of the garden that is giving me the most joy.

I will try to post about more of the flowers individually during the next month. Cistus, Eschscholzia californica (and not just orange), Roses, Iris – all deserve their own post.

Thanks to Carol for hosting.  You might want to peek over the garden wall at some blooms in other gardens so do visit Carol at MayDreamsgarden.

So here (grab a cup of tea maybe) is My Hesperides Garden on GBBD in May.  I hope your gardens are giving you as much pleasure as mine is to me, happy bloom day.

Rosa mutabilis on the wall that divides the vegetable garden from the drive

Rosa mutabilis on the wall that divides the vegetable garden from the drive

Large Island

Large Island

Iris Kent Pride with white blotched with brown Cistus

Iris Kent Pride with white blotched with brown Cistus

Philadelpus scenting the garden

Philadelpus scenting the garden

Iris Before the Storm with Eschscholzia californica

Iris Before the Storm with Eschscholzia californica

The slope

The slope

This cistus is one I took as a cutting

This cistus is one I took as a cutting

The slope

The slope

The slope

The slope

Eschscholzia californica, on the slope

Eschscholzia californica, on the slope

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Buddleia alternifolia, I am tryijng to train as a weeping tree

Buddleia alternifolia, I am tryijng to train as a weeping tree

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The pillars on the west facing side of the terrace with Rosa Clair Matin

The pillars on the west facing side of the terrace with Rosa Clair Martin

My favourite rose

My favourite rose

Rosa Romosa, South facing Terrace

Rosa Rimosa, South facing Terrace

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Large Island

Large Island

Large Island

Large Island

Large Island

Large Island

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Large Island

Large Island

Large Island looking towards the formal beds

Large Island looking towards the formal beds

Large Island

Large Island

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Looking along the back border from under the fig

Looking along the back border from under the fig

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Looking from under Mulberry along the back bed

Looking from under Mulberry along the back bed

Left Hand Border

Left Hand Border

Under Mulberry

Under Mulberry

Left Hand Border

Left Hand Border

Left Hand Border

Left Hand Border

Left hand border

Left hand border

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Rosa Stanwell's perpetual, Triangular rose bed

Rosa Stanwell’s perpetual, Triangular rose bed

Sambucus with lovely dark foliage, Triangular rose bed

Sambucus with lovely dark foliage, Triangular rose bed

Triangular rose bed

Triangular rose bed

Triangular rose bed

Triangular rose bed

Triangular rose bed

Triangular rose bed

Triangular rose bed

Triangular rose bed

The quality of the images isn’t as good as usual as today was very sunny but rain is forecast for tomorrow so I needed to get them today.

GBBD – More hangers-on than new blooms

Not much has been happening in the garden, hence no posts.  But there are a few blooms out there.  Not much new except I found this Anemone coronaria de Caen; I planted these bulbs without much hope of success as I’ve tried them before and none have ever grown.  Maybe all the rain in the autumn encouraged them to grow, anyway this one is about to open its bud, the colour is supposed to be deep pink but from the colour I can see, I don’t think that will be true.

Anemone coronaria de Caen

Anemone coronaria de Caen

Several roses have buds and even open flowers; Rosa Stanwell perpetual is showing that it is truly perpetual as long as it has enough water.

Rosa Stanwell perpetual

Rosa Stanwell perpetual

Rosa Clair Martin

Rosa Clair Martin

R. China pink

R. China pink

The weather has been changeable. Rain, mild temperatures, we were even able to have lunch on the terrace on Saturday, but cold temperatures are forecast for the end of this week (minus 6°C is promised so I must turn off the water going to taps around the garden and open the taps so they aren’t damaged (last year I missed one and the whole tap sort of exploded).

More in keeping with the season are Teucrium fruticosa, Prostrate rosemary and the beautiful Iris unguicularis.

Teucrium, a winter stallwart

Teucrium, a winter stallwart

Rosemary flowers for most of the winter

Rosemary flowers for most of the winter

Iris

Iris unguicularia

Pretty violas, in a pot I can see from the kitchen window, show their smiling faces and always make me smile.

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Viburnum tinus has a few buds just beginning to open and Eleagnus is still attracting and insects that are in the garden with its strong perfume.

A few plants are just plain confused, Ceanothus and Osteospernum shouldn’t be flowering now, nor should this Salvia!

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Salvia, side ways, sorry!

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Even a Hemerocallis is doing its best to open its untimely bloom

Even a Hemerocallis is doing its best to open its untimely bloom

A very happy Garden Bloggers Bloom Day, January 2013, to all my fellow bloggers.  Thanks to Carol for hosting; why not check out  at May Dreams for other posts to bring a little sunshine into our lives.

September GBFD – Getting the garden back

September has brought with it some refreshing rain, cooler temperatures and regrowth of foliage.

I was surprised just how many plants underwent summer dormancy this year; the high temperatures, hot wind and no rain meant that even many of my drought tolerant plants looked miserable, well to tell the truth many looked dead!  But the plants were being sensible retreating beneath the soil, or leaving brown crusty leaves above to protect and presumably reduce the temperature actually hitting the plant.

Now it seems more like spring, with new foliage pushing through the soil.  I am appreciating this growth even more than in spring because this is proof that the plants aren’t dead, so reassuring that they mayflower now, if the weather doesn’t become too cold too quickly or that they have time to build some strength before winter and another period of dormancy.

Re-emerging thyme

Bit by bit this thyme lost all signs of green until I was almost convinced it was dead, it all looked like the part on the right in the image above; now, slowly, slowly new growth is pushing through the dead, maybe I should give it a ‘haircut’ to allow more of the green foliage space to grow.

After pruning the lavender in the formal beds I was dismayed that so much seemed dead; while it was flowering all appeared well, the usual huge number of bees, butterflies and other pollinators all testified that the flowers contained the usual pollen and nectar; but after pruning there was a lot of dead wood, I did give it some water but the hedge is long and so it didn’t receive very much and hey – lavender doesn’t need irrigation!  Now most of the old wood is shooting, if you look closely you can see tiny new leaves appearing, some are doing even better with lots of new foliage covering the plants; I think one or two bushes maybe dead but they were planted quite closely so I think those adjacent will knit together to reform the hedge.

Spot the new growth

Looking down onto the upper drive border you can see there is now more green than brown. Stipa tenuissima needs a bit of a comb but the new growth is there.

I have removed most of the Festuca around the garden; even those that aren’t dead are too full of thatch which is impossible to remove.  I have some small plants that are potted up seedlings and the plants that have more living material can be pulled apart to yield some new specimens.

This year it has been easier to get started with the autumn clean-up because so much of the foliage had stopped growing.  Seeing the Iris foliage cut and looking clean and fresh really makes me feel I am getting the garden back.

Iris foliage standing to attention

This year all the foliage of the Hemerocallis died back; I enjoyed pulling away the dead leaves and seeing tiny green shoots; within a week they have grown back, I think they may even flower again!  In the background the Nepeta has also grown back quickly after trimming away all the dead flowers and foliage.

As you come in the gate at the bottom of the drive, the prostrate Rosemary always look happy, they are even beginning to flower!  That is even earlier than usual, every time I pass there is a waft of bees and butterflies in the air.

New buds and foliage, Rosa Clair Martin

Many of the roses are putting on delicately coloured new growth, this is what feels like spring, best of all there are buds and flowers as well.

Now I’m looking forward to seeing what foliage is giving you pleasure now that autumn is here in the northern hemisphere and spring in the southern.  Please just add a link to your post with your comment.  Thank you in advance I really appreciate you joining in this meme.