The Slope on Thursday 3rd October

On Sunday night and most of Monday there was heavy rain with thunder and lightning to make things even more exciting.  With so much rain the garden is beginning to really return to the green colour that I haven’t seen since spring.

Blue, blue Perovskia

Blue, blue Perovskia

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Prostrate rosemary is flowering and attracting numerous bees and blue butterflies

Prostrate rosemary is flowering and attracting numerous bees and blue butterflies

I added 3 sedum plants, taken as cuttings last year, the others were all planted last year, these three were slower to grow for some reason

I added 3 sedum plants, taken as cuttings last year, the others were all planted last year, these three were slower to grow for some reason

I've been adding some Euphorbia rigida, plants that self seeded from the plant in the Large Island

I’ve been adding some Euphorbia rigida, plants that self seeded from the plant in the Large Island

Stipa tenuissima is a fresh green now

Stipa tenuissima is a fresh green now

Even the Stipa tenuissima that I cut back so drastically a few weeks ago is now growing well.  It still shows the dreadful line where it was cut, but I’m slowly getting around, pulling out the dead thatch from the base allowing the lovely fine grass to waft in the wind.

Pennesetun

Pennesetun

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Looking up from the gate

Looking up from the gate

What’s happening in your garden today?  Is there one plant that has been flowering for months that makes you smile every time you see it?

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24 thoughts on “The Slope on Thursday 3rd October

  1. You can really see the difference the cooler weather and rain has made! I can’t believe your Perovskia, it’s been going strong for months now! Fantastic! We’re having strange weather right now…it’s been freezing or nearly freezing at night, but the daytime temperatures are soaring. Some of my perennials that are usually getting ready for their winter sleep are still blooming. So interesting.

  2. Goodness, what a transformation from the rain. Hopefully one day my own perovskia will look like that, spectacular in a wafty, gentle, romantic sort of way. I am also wondering about using some prostrate rosemary as and when I finally get the pointy end of the front garden cleared it could work well I think.

  3. Your Perovskia is so impressive! It just keeps on going doesn’t it 🙂 I love your slope updates and see some of that lovely blue sky too! As you saw in my post yesterday I have a few plants that keep on flowering and they really do make me smile. Especially when it’s pouring down like winter today!!

  4. Your garden is sitting up and looking happy with the extra rain. My garden is drinking up the rain with fervour too. My nepeta has been flowering for months and its visitors have given me such pleasure but there are far fewer flowers now and I should really cut it back. It will be like saying goodbye to an old friend.

  5. E’ vero Christina anche io ho visto che dopo tanto tempo il giardino comincia di nuovo a prendere vigore e colore. Ho lavorato tantissimo oggi fuori. Da me una pianta che non ha mai smesso di fiorire è la tulbaghia, ma anche la perovskia. Non so cosa sia successo al mio cisto è rimasto solo un ramo verde il resto è secco credo…

  6. Looks good! The rain and cooler temps must be a relief. I was wondering if you have ever considered some American plants that like sun and can take dry soil – like Winecups, Butterflyweed, or Blue False Indigo.

    • Apart from the blue False Indigo you’re going to have to tell me their Latin names as I really have no idea what plants you mean! and yes, I’m certainly willing to try plants from other places that will suit my conditions.

        • Thank you. I have grown Asclepias tuberosa, but it died, I think the winters here are too cold for it. Callirhoe inolucrata I will look up; it’s always good to know what grows well for other gardeners.

        • Too bad the A. tuberosa died, but it wouldn’t be because the winters are too cold, since it handles the winters fine as far north as USDA zone 4, which includes chilly places like Wisconsin and Minnesota. Could it have been A. curassavica (not sure on sp), which is tropical?

        • I like the colour and form of Callirhoe inolucrata, the information varies as to how drought tolerant it is. If I can find some seeds I will try it. It would be good in the ‘Magenta zone’!

  7. I am glad you had some rain! Your slope is lovely; I really like all the blues and silvers and pinks! Your Perovskia looks so pretty, and I love your prostrate rosemary. Hopefully, you will get more rain as it is needed.

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